Famous Family Members

 

 

 James “Jimmie” Earl Carter Jr.

(1924 - )

9th Cousin 1x Removed

39th President of the United States of America



James Earl Carter Sr. (1894-1953)

Father of James Earl Carter Jr.

William A. Carter (1858-1903)

Father f James Earl Carter Sr.

Littleberry Walker Carter (1832-1873)

Father of William A. Carter

Ann Ainsley (1801-1848)

Mother of Littleberry Walker Carter

Ann Morris (1772-1838))

Mother of Ann Ainsley

Job Morris (1711-1767)

Father of Ann Morris

Richard Morris (1682-1742)

Father of Job Morris

Elizabeth Almy (1663-1711)

Mother of Richard Morris

Elizabeth Cornell (1637-1714)

Mother of Elizabeth Almy

Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)

Father of Elizabeth Cornell

Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)

Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.

Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)

Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.

Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)

Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.

Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)

Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.

Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)

Son of Elijah Cornell

John Cornell (1788-1860)

Son of Ezra Cornell

Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)

Son of John Cornell

Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)

Son of Harrison Cornell

George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)

Son of Lafayette Cornell

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of George Everett Cornell

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Mary Alice Cornell


 Born on October 1, 1924, in Plains, Georgia, Jimmy Carter was 39th president of the United States (1977-81) and served as the nation's chief executive during a time of serious problems at home and abroad. Carter's perceived mishandling of these issues led to defeat in his bid for reelection. He later turned to diplomacy and advocacy, for which he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace in 2002.

Early life

President of the United States of America. James Earl Carter Jr. was born on October 1, 1924 in Plains, Georgia. His father, James Earl Carter Sr., was a hardworking peanut farmer who owned his own small plot of land as well as a warehouse and store. His mother, Bessie Lillian Gordy, was a registered nurse who in the 1920s had crossed racial divides to counsel black women on health care issues. When Jimmy Carter was four years old, the family relocated to Archery, a town approximately two miles from Plains. It was a sparsely populated and deeply rural town, where mule-drawn wagons remained the dominant mode of transportation and electricity and indoor plumbing were still uncommon. Carter was a studious boy who avoided trouble and began working at his father's store at the age of ten. His favorite childhood pastime was sitting with his father in the evenings, listening to baseball games and politics on the battery-operated radio.

Both of Carter's parents were deeply religious. They belonged to Plains Baptist Church and insisted that Carter attend Sunday school, which his father occasionally taught. Carter attended the all-white Plains High School while the area's majority black population received educations at home or at church. Despite this pervasive segregation, two of Carter's closest childhood friends were African American, as were two of the most influential adults in his life, his nanny Annie Mae Hollis and his father's worker Jack Clark. While the Great Depression hit most of the rural south very hard, the Carters managed to prosper during these years, and by the late 1930s his father had over 200 workers employed on his farms. In 1941, Jimmy Carter became the first person from his father's side of the family to graduate from high school.

Carter studied engineering at Georgia Southwestern Junior College before joining the Naval ROTC program to continue his engineering studies at the Georgia Institute of Technology. He then applied to the highly competitive Naval Academy in Annapolis, Maryland, which accepted him to begin studies in the summer of 1943. With his reflective, introverted personality and small stature (Carter stood only five feet, nine inches tall), he did not fit in well among his fellow midshipmen. Nevertheless, Carter continued to excel at academics, graduating in the top ten percent of his class in 1946. While on leave in the summers, Carter had reconnected with a girl named Rosalynn Smith whom he had known since childhood. They married in June 1946.

The Navy assigned Jimmy Carter to work on submarines, and in the early years of their marriage, the Carters – like many a military family – moved frequently. After a training program in Norfolk, Virginia, they moved out to Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, where Carter was an electronics officer on the USS Pomfret. After subsequent postings to Groton, Connecticut; San Diego, California and Washington, D.C., in 1952 Carter was assigned to work with Admiral Hyman Rickover developing a nuclear submarine program in Schenectady, New York. The brilliant and notoriously demanding admiral made a profound impression on Carter. "I think, second to my own father, Rickover had more effect on my life than any other man," he later said.

During these years, the Carters also had three sons: John William (born 1947), James Earl Carter III (1950) and Donnel Jeffrey (1952). (The Carters later had a daughter, Amy, born in 1967). In July 1953, Carter's father passed away from pancreatic cancer and in the aftermath of his death, the farm and family business fell into disarray. Although Rosalynn initially objected, Carter moved his family back to rural Georgia so he could care for his mother and take over the family's affairs. In Georgia, Carter resuscitated the family farm and became active in community politics, winning a seat on the Sumter County Board of Education in 1955 and eventually becoming its chairman.

Taking Office

Carter assumed the presidency in a time of considerable optimism, initially enjoying sky-high approval ratings. Symbolizing his commitment to a new kind of leadership, after his inaugural address Carter got out of his limousine to walk to the White House amongst his supporters. Carter's main domestic priority involved energy policy. With oil prices rising, and in the aftermath of the 1973 oil embargo, Carter believed it imperative to cure the United States of its dependence on foreign oil. Although Carter succeeded in decreasing foreign oil consumption by eight percent and developing huge emergency stores of oil and natural gas, the Iranian Revolution of 1979 again drove up oil prices and led to long lines at gas stations, overshadowing Carter's achievements.

Carter's foreign policy centered around a promise to make human rights a central concern in the United States' relations with other countries. He suspended economic and military aid to Chile, El Salvador and Nicaragua in protest of those regimes' human rights abuses. But Carter's most notable foreign policy achievement was his successful mediation of the Camp David Accords between Israel and Egypt, leading to a historic peace treaty in which Israel withdrew from the Sinai and the two sides officially recognized each other's governments.

However, despite these noteworthy achievements, Carter's presidency was widely considered a failure. He had very poor relationships with Congress and the media, stifling his ability to enact legislation or effectively communicate his policies. In 1979 Carter delivered a disastrous speech, referred to as the "Crisis of Confidence" speech, in which he seemed to blame America's problems on the poor spirit of its people. Several foreign policy blunders also contributed to Carter's loosening grip on the presidency. His secret negotiations to return the Panama Canal to Panama led many people to believe he was a weak leader who had "given away" the canal without securing necessary provisions for defending U.S. interests.

Iran Hostage Crisis

Probably the biggest factor in Carter's declining political fortunes, however, was the Iranian Hostage Crisis. In November 1979, radical Iranian students seized the United States Embassy in Tehran, taking 66 Americans hostage. Carter's failure to negotiate the hostages' release, followed by a badly botched rescue mission, made him look like an impotent leader who had been outmaneuvered by a group of radical students. The hostages were held for 444 days before finally being released on the day Carter left office.

Ronald Reagan, the former actor and governor of California, challenged Carter for the presidency in 1980. Reagan ran a smooth and effective campaign, simply asking voters, "Are you better off than you were four years ago?" Most were not; Reagan crushed Carter in the 1980 election, which was essentially a referendum on a failed presidency. As the New York Times put it, "On Election Day, Mr. Carter was the issue."6

Legacy of Humanitarianism

Despite a largely unsuccessful one-term presidency, Jimmy Carter later rehabilitated his reputation through his humanitarian efforts after leaving the White House. He is now widely considered one of the greatest ex-presidents in American history. He has worked extensively with Habitat for Humanity and founded the Carter Presidential Center to promote human rights and alleviate suffering across the globe. In particular, Carter has worked effectively as an ex-president to develop community-based health care systems in Africa and Latin America, to oversee elections in fledgling democracies and to promote peace in the Middle East. In 2002, Jimmy Carter received the Nobel Peace Prize "for his decades of untiring effort to find peaceful solutions to international conflicts, to advance democracy and human rights, and to promote economic and social development." Carter has also written many books in the years since his presidency, including several memoirs, Our Endangered Values: America's Moral Crisis (2006) and Palestine: Peace Not Apartheid (2007).

Jimmy Carter will not go down in history as one of America's most effective presidents. However, because of his tireless work both before and since his presidency in support of equality, human rights and the alleviation of human suffering, Carter will go down as one of the nation's great social activists. Delivering his Nobel Lecture in 2002, Carter concluded with words that can be seen as both his life mission and his call to action for future generations. "The bond of our common humanity is stronger than the divisiveness of our fears and prejudices," he said. "God gives us the capacity for choice. We can choose to alleviate suffering. We can choose to work together for peace. We can make these changes – and we must."

 

 

Richard Milhous Nixon


(1885-1967)

9th Cousin 1x Removed

37th President of the United States of America




Hannah Milhous (1885-1967)

Mother of Richard Milhous Nixon

Almira Park Burdge (1849-1943)

Mother of Hannah Milhous

Oliver Burdge (1821-1908)

Father of Almira Park Burdge

Jacob Burdge Jr. (1783-1862)

Father of Oliver Burdge

Jacob Burdge Sr. (1743-1797)

Father of Jacob Burdge Jr.

Sarah Morris (1722-1796)

Mother of Jacob Burdge Sr.

Richard Morris (1682-1741)

Father of Sarah Morris

Elizabeth Almy (1663-1711)

Mother of Richard Morris

Elizabeth Cornell (1637-1714)

Mother of Elizabeth Almy

Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)

Father of Elizabeth Cornell

Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)

Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.

Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)

Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.

Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)

Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.

Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)

Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.

Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)

Son of Elijah Cornell

John Cornell (1788-1860)

Son of Ezra Cornell

Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)

Son of John Cornell

Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)

Son of Harrison Cornell

George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)

Son of Lafayette Cornell

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of George Everett Cornell

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Mary Alice Cornell


 

 Born on January 9, 1913, in Yorba Linda, California, Richard Nixon was a Republican congressman who served as vice president under Dwight D. Eisenhower. Nixon ran for president in 1960 but lost to charismatic Massachusetts senator John F. Kennedy. Undeterred, Nixon return to the race eight years later and won the White House by a solid margin. In 1974, he resigned rather than be impeached for covering up illegal activities of party members in the Watergate affair. He died on April 22, 1994, at age 81, in New York City.

Early Life and Military Service

Born on January 9, 1913, in Yorba Linda, California, Richard Milhous Nixon was the second of five children born to Frank Nixon and Hannah Milhouse Nixon. His father was a service station owner and grocer, who also owned a small lemon farm in Yorba Linda. His mother was a Quaker who exerted a strong influence on her son. Richard Nixon's early life was hard, as he characterized by saying, "We were poor, but the glory of it was we didn't know it." The family experienced tragedy twice early in Richard's life: His younger brother died in 1925 after a short illness, and in 1933, his older brother, whom he greatly admired, died of tuberculosis.

Richard Nixon attended Fullerton High School but later transferred to Whittier High School, where he ran for student body president (but lost to a more popular student). Nixon graduated high school second in his class and was offered a scholarship to Harvard, but his family couldn't afford the travel and living expenses. Instead of Harvard, Nixon attended local Whittier College, a Quaker institution, where he earned a reputation as a formidable debater, a standout in college drama productions and a successful athlete. Upon graduation from Whittier in 1934, Nixon received a full scholarship to Duke University Law School in Durham, N.C. After graduation, Nixon returned to the town of Whittier to practice law at Kroop & Bewley. He soon met Thelma Catherine ("Pat") Ryan, a teacher and amateur actress, after the two were cast in the same play at a local community theater. The couple married in 1940 and went on to have two daughters, Tricia and Julie.

A career as a small-town lawyer was not enough for a man with Nixon's ambition, so in August 1942, he and Pat moved to Washington, D.C., where he took a job in Franklin Roosevelt's Office of Price Administration. He soon became disillusioned with the New Deal's big-government programs and bureaucratic red tape, though, and left the public service realm for the U.S. Navy (despite his an exemption from military service as a Quaker and in his job with OPA). Serving as an aviation ground officer in the Pacific, Nixon saw no combat, but he returned to the United States with two service stars and several commendations. He eventually rose to the rank of lieutenant commander before resigning his commission in January 1946.

U.S. Congress

Following his return to civilian life, Nixon was approached by a group of Whittier Republicans who encouraged him to run for Congress. Nixon would be up against five-term liberal Democratic Jerry Voorhis, but he took on the challenge head-on. Nixon's campaign exploited notions about Voorhis's alleged communist sympathies, a tactic that would recur throughout his political life, and it worked, helping Nixon win a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives in November 1946. During his first term, Nixon was assigned to the Select Committee on Foreign Aid and went to Europe to report on the newly enacted Marshall Plan. There he quickly established a reputation as an internationalist in foreign policy.

As a member of the House Un-American Activities Committee (HUAC) from 1948 to 1950, he took a leading role in the investigation of Alger Hiss, a former State Department official with a previously stellar reputation. While many believed Hiss, Nixon took the allegations that Hiss was spying for the Soviet Union to heart. In dramatic testimony before the committee, Hiss vehemently denied the charge and refuted claims made by his accuser, Whittaker Chambers. Nixon brought Hiss to the witness stand, and under stinging cross-examination, Hiss admitted that he had known Chambers, but under a different name. This brought Hiss a perjury charge and five years in prison, while Nixon's hostile questioning of Hiss during the committee hearings went a long way toward cementing his national reputation as a fervent anti-Communist.

In 1950, Nixon successfully ran for the United States Senate against Democrat Helen Gahagan Douglas. She had been an outspoken opponent of the anti-Communist scare and the actions of HUAC. Employing his previous (successful) campaign tactics, Nixon's campaign staff distributed flyers on pink paper unfairly distorting Douglas's voting record as left-wing. For his efforts, The Independent Review, a small Southern California newspaper, nicknamed Nixon "Tricky Dick," a derogatory nickname that would remain with him for the rest of this life.

Retirement and Death

After his resignation, Richard Nixon retired with his wife to the seclusion of his estate in San Clemente, California, where he spent several months distraught and disoriented. Gradually he regrouped, and by 1977 he began forming a public-relations comeback. In August, Nixon met with British commentator David Frost for a series of interviews during which Nixon sent mixed messages of contrition and pride, while never admitting any wrong-doing. While the interviews were met with mixed reviews, they were watched by many and positively contributed to Nixon's public image.

In 1978, Nixon published RN: The Memoirs of Richard Nixon, an intensely personal examination of his life, public career and White House years; the book became a best-seller. He also authored several books on international affairs and American foreign policy, modestly rehabilitating his public reputation and earning him a role as an elder foreign-policy expert.

On June 22, 1993, Pat Nixon died of lung cancer. Nixon took the loss hard, and on April 22, 1994, just 10 months after his wife's death, Richard Nixon died of a massive stroke in New York City. President Bill Clinton was joined by four former presidents to pay homage to the 37th president. His body lay in repose in the Nixon Library lobby, and an estimated 50,000 people waited in a heavy rain for up to 18 hours to file past the casket and pay their last respects. He was buried beside his wife at his birthplace, in Yorba Linda, California.

 

 

Frances Cornelia Folsom CLEVELAND


(1864-1947)

8th Cousin 1x Removed

First Lady and Wife of Grover Cleveland 22nd & 24th President of the United States of America




Emma Cornelia Harmon (1841-1915)

Mother of Frances Cordelia Folsom

Ruth Haywood Rogers (1809-1887)

Mother of Emma Cordelia Harmon

Mercy Champlin (1783-1857)

Mother of Ruth Haywood Rogers

Stephen Champlin III (1763-1848)

Father of Mercy Champlin

Stephen Champlin Jr. (1734-1778)

Father of Stephen Champlin III

Mary Hazzard (1716-1773)

Mother of Stephen Champlin Jr.

Sarah Borden (1694-1765)

Mother of Mary Hazzard

Innocent Cornell (1673-1720)

Mother of Sarah Borden

Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)

Father of Innocent Cornell

Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)

Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.

Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)

Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.

Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)

Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.

Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)

Son of Elijah Cornell

John Cornell (1788-1860)

Son of Ezra Cornell

Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)

Son of John Cornell

Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)

Son of Harrison Cornell

George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)

Son of Lafayette Cornell

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of George Everett Cornell

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Mary Alice Cornell


 

 Frances Cleveland was born on July 21, 1864, in Buffalo, New York. She married President Grover Cleveland on June 2, 1886. The couple had four daughters and two sons. Grover Cleveland died in 1908, and Frances remarried in 1913. Frances became active in the Needlework Guild during World War I, later serving as its national president from 1925 to 1940. She died on October 29, 1947, in Baltimore, Maryland.

Early Years

Frances Cleveland was born Frances Clara Folsom on July 21, 1864, in Buffalo, New York. Her father, an attorney named Oscar, died in a carriage accident two days after Frances' ninth birthday. Her mother, Emma Harmon, would eventually remarry. Frances had one sibling, a sister named Nellie.

Frances received her early education at Miss Bissell's School for Young Ladies, followed by the Medina Academy for Boys and Girls. She left Central [High] School in Buffalo in her senior year, but completed the necessary coursework to earn her diploma. In 1882 she enrolled at Wells College in Aurora, New York. After graduating in 1885, Frances and her mother spent nine months traveling throughout Europe.

First Lady

In the spring of 1885, while visiting Washington, D.C., with her mother, Frances received a marriage proposal from Grover Cleveland, the president of the United States. Upon returning from her trip to Europe, at 21 years old, Frances married the president in the White House's Blue Room on June 2, 1886. By doing so, Frances became the youngest-ever American first lady. She was also the only first lady ever to have been married at the White House.

After the newlyweds came home from their honeymoon in Maryland, Frances took over the title of first lady, which Grover's younger sister, Libbie, had assumed for the previous 14 months.

A statuesque beauty, Frances quickly became America's sweetheart. Before long, companies were asking her to endorse their products, somewhat to the chagrin of her husband, who feared for her safety as she was increasingly surrounded by throngs of admirers. When she accompanied the president on his tour of the southern and western United States in 1887, it only served to further her celebrity. After appearing on the covers of Harper's and Leslie'sthat year, "Frankie" became a fashion trendsetter for women all over the country.

Frances supported projects in Washington, including the Women's Christian Temperance Movement's "Hope and Help Project," and helped establish the Washington Home for Friendless Colored Girls.

Grover Cleveland's first term ended in 1889, and he would not take office for his second (noncontinuous) term until January 1893. In the interim, Frances gave birth to a daughter, Ruth (1891). She was pregnant again by the time her husband started his second term and gave birth to another daughter, Ester, in September 1893. During Cleveland's second term, the family welcomed a third daughter, Marion (1895), to the world.

After the White House

When Cleveland's second term ended in January 1897, the family moved to Princeton, New Jersey, and later that year Frances gave birth to the couple's first son, Richard. Francis, the couple's second son, was born in 1903, but, tragically, a year later, her 12-year-old daughter, Ruth, died of diphtheria.

Grover Cleveland died on June 24, 1908. Frances remarried, to art history professor Thomas Jex Preston Jr., in February of 1913. In 1915, after moving to London, the couple became involved in the National Security League. 

During World War I, Frances became active in the Needlework Guild. She later served as national president of the organization from 1925 to 1940.

Frances Cleveland died on October 29, 1947, in Baltimore, Maryland. She lived longer than any other first lady had after leaving the White House.

 

 Franklin Delano Roosevelt

(1882-1945)

1st Cousin 3x Removed of Husband of 5th Cousin 5x Removed

32nd President of the United States of America




Sara Van Delano (1854-1941)

Mother of Franklin Delano Roosevelt

Catherine Robbins Lyman (1825-1896)

Mother of Sara Van Delano

Anne Jean Robbins (1789-1867)

Mother of Catherine Robbins Lyman

Elizabeth Murray (1733-)

Mother of Anne Jean Robbins

James Murray (1713-781)

Father of Elizabeth Murray

Dorothy Murray (1745-1811)

Daughter of James Murray

James Grant Forbes (1769-1826)

Son of Dorothy Murray

Francis Elizabeth Blackwell (1780-1845)

Wife of James Grant Forbes

Joseph Blackwell Sr. (1744-1808)

Father of Francis Elizabeth Blackwell

Jacob Frances Blackwell Jr. (1717-1780)

Father of Joseph Blackwell Sr.

Mary Hallett (1687-1743)

Mother of Jacob Frances Blackwell Jr.

Sarah Woosley (1650-1727)

Mother of Mary Hallett

Rebecca Cornell (1622-1713)

Mother of Sarah Woosley

Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)

Father of Rebecca Cornell

Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)

Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.

Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)

Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.

Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)

Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.

Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)

Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.

Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)

Son of Elijah Cornell

John Cornell (1788-1860)

Son of Ezra Cornell

Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)

Son of John Cornell

Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)

Son of Harrison Cornell

George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)

Son of Lafayette Cornell

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of George Everett Cornell

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Mary Alice Cornell


 Born on January 30, 1882, in Hyde Park, New York, Franklin D. Roosevelt was stricken with polio in 1921. He became the 32nd U.S. president in 1933, and was the only president to be elected four times. Roosevelt led the United States through the Great Depression and World War II, and greatly expanded the powers of the federal government through a series of programs and reforms known as the New Deal. Roosevelt died in Georgia in 1945.

Early Life

Franklin Delano Roosevelt was born on January 30, 1882, into a wealthy family. The Roosevelts had been prominent for several generations, having made their fortune in real estate and trade. Franklin was the only child of James Roosevelt and Sara Ann Delano Roosevelt. The family lived at Springwood, their estate in the Hudson River Valley in New York State. While growing up, Franklin Roosevelt was surrounded by privilege and a sense of self-importance. He was educated by tutors and governesses until age 14, and the entire household revolved around him, with his mother being the dominant figure in his life, even into adulthood. His upbringing was so unlike the common people who he would later champion.

In 1896, Franklin Roosevelt attended Groton School for boys, a prestigious Episcopal preparatory school in Massachusetts. The experience was a difficult one for him, as he did not fit in with the other students. Groton men excelled in athletics and Roosevelt did not. He strived to please the adults and took to heart the teachings of Groton's headmaster, Endicott Peabody, who urged students to help the less fortunate through public service.

After graduating from Groton in 1900, Franklin Roosevelt entered Harvard University, determined to make something of himself. Though only a C student, he was a member of the Alpha Delta Phi fraternity, editor of the Harvard Crimson newspaper and received his degree in only three years. However, the general consensus was that he was underwhelming and average. During his last year at Harvard, he became engaged to Eleanor Roosevelt, his fifth cousin. She was the niece of Franklin's idol, Theodore Roosevelt. They married on March 17, 1905.

Franklin studied law at Columbia University Law School and passed the bar exam in 1907, though he didn't receive a degree. For the next three years, he practiced corporate law in New York, living the typical upper-class life. But he found law practice boring and restrictive. He set his sights on greater accomplishments.

Political Beginnings

In 1910, at age 28, Roosevelt was invited to run for the New York state senate. Breaking from family tradition, he ran as a Democrat in a district that had voted Republican for the past 32 years. He campaigned hard and won the election with the help of his name and a Democratic landslide. As a state senator, Roosevelt opposed elements of the Democratic political machine in New York. This won him the ire of party leaders, but gained him national notoriety and valuable experience in political tactics and intrigue. During this time, he formed an alliance with Louis Howe, who would shape his political career for the next 25 years. Roosevelt was reelected in 1912 and served as chair of the agricultural committee, passing farm and labor bills and social welfare programs.

During the 1912 National Democratic Convention, Roosevelt supported presidential candidate Woodrow Wilson and was rewarded with an appointment as Assistant Secretary of the Navy, the same job his idol, Theodore Roosevelt, had used to catapult himself to the presidency. Franklin Roosevelt was energetic and an efficient administrator. He specialized in business operations, working with Congress to get budgets approved and systems modernized, and he founded the U.S. Naval Reserve. But he was restless in the position as "second chair" to his boss, Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels, who was less enthusiastic about supporting a large and efficient naval force.

In 1914, Franklin Roosevelt, decided to run for the U.S. Senate seat for New York. The proposition was doomed from the start, as he lacked White House support. President Wilson needed the Democratic political machine to get his social reforms passed and ensure his reelection. He could not support Franklin Roosevelt, who had made too many political enemies among New York Democrats. Roosevelt was soundly defeated in the primary election and learned a valuable lesson that national stature could not defeat a well-organized local political organization.

In politics, Franklin Roosevelt was finding personal as well as professional success. He took to Washington politics and thrived on personal relationships. He was often seen at the most prominent parties and was considered by women to be a very attractive man. In 1914, he developed a relationship with Lucy Mercer, Eleanor Roosevelt's social secretary, which evolved into a love affair. In 1918, Eleanor discovered the affair and gave Franklin an ultimatum to stop seeing Lucy or she would file for divorce. He agreed, but continued to secretly see Mercer over the years.

With his political career thriving, Franklin D. Roosevelt accepted the nomination for vice president—as James M. Cox's running mate—at the 1920 Democratic Convention. The pair was soundly defeated by Republican Warren G. Harding in the general election, but the experience gave Roosevelt national exposure.

Polio Diagnosis

While vacationing at Campobello Island, New Brunswick, Canada, he was diagnosed as having contracted polio. At first, he refused to accept that he was permanently paralyzed. He tried numerous therapies and even bought the Warm Springs resort in Georgia seeking a cure. Despite his efforts, he never regained the use of his legs. He later established a foundation at Warm Springs to help others, and instituted the March of Dimes program that eventually funded an effective polio vaccine.

For a time, Franklin Roosevelt was resigned to being a victim of polio, believing his political career to be over. But Eleanor Roosevelt and political confidante Louis Howe encouraged him to continue on. Over the next several years, Roosevelt worked to improve his physical and political image. He taught himself to walk short distances in his braces and was careful not to be seen in public using his wheelchair. He also began to repair his relationship with New York's Democratic political machine. Roosevelt appeared at the 1924 and 1928 Democratic National Conventions to nominate New York governor Al Smith for president, which increased his national exposure.

U.S. Presidency

Al Smith urged Franklin Roosevelt to run for governor of New York, in 1928. Roosevelt was narrowly elected, and the victory gave him confidence that his political star was rising. As governor, he believed in progressive government and instituted a number of new social programs. By 1930, Republicans were being blamed for the Great Depression and Franklin Roosevelt sensed opportunity. He began his run for the presidency, calling for government intervention in the economy to provide relief, recovery and reform. His upbeat, positive approach and personal charm helped him defeat Republican incumbent Herbert Hoover in November 1932. By the time Roosevelt took office in March of 1933, there were 13 million unemployed Americans, and hundreds of banks were closed. Roosevelt faced the greatest crisis in American history since the Civil War.

In his first 100 days, President Franklin Roosevelt proposed sweeping economic reform, calling it the "New Deal." He ordered the temporary closure on all banks to halt the run on deposits. He formed a "Brain Trust" of economic advisors who designed the alphabet agencies such as the AAA (Agricultural Adjustment Administration) to support farm prices, the CCC (Civilian Conservation Corps) to employ young men, and the NRA (National Recovery Administration), which regulated wages and prices. Other agencies insured bank deposits, regulated the stock market, subsidized mortgages, and provided relief to the unemployed.

By 1936, the economy showed signs of improvement. Gross national product was up 34 percent, and unemployment had dropped from 25 percent to 14 percent. But Franklin Roosevelt faced criticism for increased government spending, unbalanced budgets, and what some perceived as moving the country toward socialism. Several New Deal acts were declared unconstitutional by the U.S. Supreme Court. Roosevelt retaliated by proposing to "pack" the court with justices more favorable to his reforms. Many in Congress, including some Democrats, rejected the idea. By 1938, negative publicity, a continuing sluggish economy, and Republican victories in mid-term elections virtually ended Roosevelt's ability to pass more reform legislation.

Since the end of World War I, America had adopted an isolationist policy in foreign affairs. In the early 1930s, Congress passed the Neutrality Acts to prevent the United States from becoming entangled in foreign conflicts. In 1933, Franklin D. Roosevelt stepped away from the unilateral principle of the Monroe Doctrine and established the Good Neighbor Policy with Latin America. However, as military conflicts emerged in Asia and Europe, Roosevelt sought ways to assist China in its war with Japan and declared France and Great Britain were America's "first line of defense" against Nazi Germany.

 

 

Hiram Ulysses Simpson Grant


(1822-1885)

3rd Cousin of Husband of 1st Cousin 1x Removed of Husband of 5th Cousin 5x Removed

18th President of the United States of America


Jesse Root Grant (1794-1873)

Father of Ulysses S. Grant

Noah Grant Jr. (1748-1819)

Father of Jesse Root Grant

Susanna Delano (1647-1720)

Mother of Noah Grant Jr.

Jonathan Delano (1647-1720)

Father of Susanna Delano

Thomas Delano (1704-1798)

Son of Jonathan Delano

Ephraim Delano (1733-1815)

Son of Thomas Delano

Warren Delano (1779-1866)

Son of Ephraim Delano

Warren Delano II (1809-1898)

Son of Warren Delano

Catherine Robbins Lyman (1825-1896)

Wife of Warren Delano II

Anne Jean Robbins (1789-1867)

Mother of Catherine Robbins Lyman

Elizabeth Murray (1733-)

Mother of Anne Jean Robbins

James Murray (1713-1781)

Father of Elizabeth Murray

Dorothy Murray (1745-1811)

Daughter of James Murray

James Grant Forbes (1769-1826)

Son of Dorothy Murray

Francis Elizabeth Blackwell (1780-1845)

Wife of James Grant Forbes

Joseph Blackwell Sr. (1744-1808)

Father of Francis Elizabeth Blackwell

Jacob Frances Blackwell Jr. (1717-1780)

Father of Joseph Blackwell Sr.

Mary Hallett (1687-1743)

Mother of Jacob Frances Blackwell Jr.

Sarah Woosley (1650-1727)

Mother of Mary Hallett

Rebecca Cornell (1622-1713)

Mother of Sarah Woosley

Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)

Father of Rebecca Cornell

Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)

Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.

Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)

Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.

Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)

Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.

Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)

Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.

Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)

Son of Elijah Cornell

John Cornell (1788-1860)

Son of Ezra Cornell

Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)

Son of John Cornell

Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)

Son of Harrison Cornell

George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)

Son of Lafayette Cornell

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of George Everett Cornell

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Mary Alice Cornell


 

 Ulysses S. Grant was born on April 27, 1822, in Point Pleasant, Ohio. He was entrusted with command of all U.S. armies in 1864, and relentlessly pursued the enemy during the Civil War. In 1869, at age 46, Grant became the youngest president theretofore. Though Grant was highly scrupulous, his administration was tainted with scandal. After leaving the presidency, he commissioned Mark Twain to publish his best-selling memoirs.

Younger Years

President Ulysses S. Grant was born Hiram Ulysses Grant on April, 27, 1822, in Point Pleasant, Ohio, near the mouth of the Big Indian Creek at the Ohio River. His famous moniker, "U.S. Grant," came after he joined the military. He was the first son of Jesse Root Grant, a tanner and businessman, and Hannah Simpson Grant. A year after Grant was born, his family moved to Georgetown, Ohio, and had what he described as an "uneventful" childhood. He did, however, show great aptitude as a horseman in his youth.

Grant was not a standout in his youth. Shy and reserved, he took after his mother rather than his outgoing father. He hated the idea of working in his father's tannery business—a fact that his father begrudgingly acknowledged. When Grant was 17, his father arranged for him to enter the United States Military Academy at West Point. A clerical error had listed him as Ulysses S. Grant. Not wanting to be rejected by the school, he changed his name on the spot.

Grant didn't excel at West Point, earning average grades and receiving several demerits for slovenly dress and tardiness, and ultimately decided that the academy "had no charms" for him. He did well in mathematics and geology and excelled in horsemanship. In 1843, he graduated 21st out of 39, and was glad to be out. He planned to resign from the military after he served his mandatory four years of duty.

Early Career

After graduation, Lieutenant Ulysses S. Grant was stationed in St. Louis, Missouri, where he met his future wife, Julia Dent. Grant proposed marriage in 1844, and Julia accepted. Before the couple could wed, however, he was shipped off for duty. During the Mexican-American War, Grant served as quartermaster, efficiently overseeing the movement of supplies. Serving under General Zachary Taylor and later under General Winfield Scott, he closely observed their military tactics and leadership skills. After getting the opportunity to lead a company into combat, Grant was credited for his bravery under fire. He also developed strong feelings that the war was wrong, and that it was being waged only to increase America's territory for the spread of slavery.

After a four-year engagement, Ulysses and Julia were finally married in 1848. Over the next six years, the couple had four children, and Grant was assigned to several posts. In 1852, he was sent to Fort Vancouver, in what is now Washington State. He missed Julia and his two sons—the second of whom he had not yet seen at this time—and thusly became involved in several failed business ventures in an attempt to get his family to the coast, closer to him. He began to drink, and a reputation was forged that dogged him all through his military career.

In the summer of 1853, Grant was promoted to captain and transferred to Fort Humboldt on the Northern California coast, where he had a run-in with the fort's commanding officer, Lieutenant Colonel Robert C. Buchanan. On July, 31, 1854, Grant resigned from the Army amid allegations of heavy drinking and warnings of disciplinary action.

In 1854, Ulysses S. Grant moved his family back to Missouri, but the return to civilian life led him to a low point. He tried to farm land that had been given to him by his father-in-law, but this venture proved to be unsuccessful after a few years. Grant then failed to find success with a real estate venture, and was denied employment as an engineer and clerk in St. Louis. To support his family, he was reduced to selling firewood on a St. Louis street. Finally, in 1860, he humbled himself and went to work in his father's tannery business as a clerk, supervised by his two younger brothers.

American Civil War Begins

On April 13, 1861, Confederate troops attacked Fort Sumter in Charleston Harbor, South Carolina. This act of rebellion sparked Ulysses S. Grant's patriotism, and he volunteered his military services. Again he was initially rejected for appointments, but with the aid of an Illinois congressman, he was appointed to command an unruly 21st Illinois volunteer regiment. Applying lessons that he'd learned from his commanders during the Mexican-American War, Grant saw that the regiment was combat-ready by September 1861.

When Kentucky's fragile neutrality fell apart in the fall of 1861, Grant and his volunteers took the small town of Paducah, Kentucky, at the mouth of the Tennessee River. In February 1862, in a joint operation with the U.S. Navy, Grant's ground forces applied pressure on Fort Henry and Fort Donelson, taking them both—these battles are credited as the earliest significant Union victories of the American Civil War. After the assault on Fort Donelson, Grant earned the moniker "Unconditional Surrender Grant" and was promoted to major general of volunteers.

Battle of Shiloh, Vicksburg Siege and the Battles for Chattanooga

In April 1862, Ulysses S. Grant moved his army cautiously into enemy territory in Tennessee, in what would later become known as the Battle of Shiloh (or the Battle of Pittsburg Landing), one of the bloodiest battles of the Civil War. Confederate commanders Albert Sidney Johnston and P.G.T. Beauregard led a surprise attack against Grant's forces, with fierce fighting occurring at an area known as the "Hornets' Nest" during the first wave of assault. Confederate General Johnston was mortally wounded, and his second-in-command, General Beauregard, decided against a night assault on Grant's forces. Reinforcement finally arrived, and Grant was able to defeat the Confederates during the second day of battle.

The Battle of Shiloh proved to be a watershed for the American military and a near disaster for Grant. Though he was supported by President Abraham Lincoln, Grant faced heavy criticism from members of Congress and the military brass for the high casualties, and for a time, he was demoted. A war department investigation led to his reinstatement.

Union war strategy called for taking control of the Mississippi River and cutting the Confederacy in half. In December 1862, Grant moved overland to take Vicksburg—a key fortress city of the Confederacy—but his attack was stalled by Confederate cavalry raider Nathan Bedford Forest, as well as due to getting bogged down in the bayous north of Vicksburg. In his second attempt, Grant cut some, but not all, of his supply lines, moved his men down the western bank of the Mississippi River, and crossed south of Vicksburg. Failing to take the city after several assaults, he settled into a long siege, and Vicksburg finally surrendered on July 4, 1863.

Though Vicksburg marked both Grant's greatest achievement thus far and a moral boost for the Union, rumors of Grant's heavy drinking followed him through the rest of the Western Campaign. Grant suffered from intense migraine headaches due to stress, which nearly disabled him and only helped to spread rumors of his drinking, as many chalked up his migraines to frequent hangovers. However, his closest associates said that he was sober and polite, and that he displayed deep concentration, even in the midst of a battle.

In October 1863, Grant took command at Chattanooga, Tennessee. The following month, from November 22 to November 25, Union forces routed Confederate troops in Tennessee at the battles of Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge, known collectively as the Battle of Chattanooga. The victories forced the Confederates to retreat into Georgia, ending the siege of the vital railroad junction of Chattanooga—and ultimately paving the way for Union General William Tecumseh Sherman's Atlanta campaign and march to Savannah, Georgia, in 1864.

War Ends in Union Victory

Ulysses S. Grant saw the military objectives of the Civil War differently than most of his predecessors, who believed that capturing territory was most important to winning the war. Grant adamantly believed that taking down the Confederate armies was most important to the war effort, and to that end, set out to track down and destroy General Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia. From March 1864 until April 1865, Grant doggedly hunted for Lee in the forests of Virginia, all the while inflicting unsustainable casualties on Lee's army.

On April 9, 1865, Lee surrendered his army, marking the end of the Civil War. The two generals met at a farm near the village of Appomattox Court House, and a peace agreement was signed. In a magnanimous gesture, Grant allowed Lee's men to keep their horses and return to their homes, taking none of them as prisoners of war.

Presidency

During post-war reorganization, Ulysses S. Grant was promoted to full general and oversaw the military portion of Reconstruction. He was then put in an awkward position during President Andrew Johnson's fight with the Radical Republicans and Johnson's impeachment. Subsequently, in 1868, Grant was elected the 18th president of the United States. When he entered the White House the following year, Grant was not only politically inexperienced, he was—at the age of 46—the youngest president theretofore.

Though scrupulously honest, Grant became known for appointing people who were not of good character. While he had some success during his time in office, including pushing through ratification of the 15th Amendment and establishing the National Parks Service, his administration's scandals rocked both of his presidential terms, and he didn't get the opportunity to serve a third.



 

 

 John Forbes Kerry

(1943-)


10th Cousin

United States Secretary of State



Rosemary Isabel Forbes (1913-2002)

Mother of John Forbes Kerry

James Grant Forbes Sr. (1879-1955)

Father of Rosemary Isabel Forbes

Francis Blackwell Forbes (1839-1908)

Father of James Grant Forbes Sr.

John Murray Forbes (1807-1885)

Father of Francis Blackwell Forbes

Frances Elizabeth Blackwell (1780-1845)

Mother of John Murray Forbes

Joseph Blackwell Sr. (1744-1808)

Father of Frances Elizabeth Blackwell

Jacob Francis Blackwell Jr. (1717-1780)

Father of Joseph Blackwell Sr.

Mary Hallett (1687-1743)

Mother of Jacob Frances Blackwell Jr.

Sarah Woosley (1650-1727)

Mother of Mary Hallett

Rebecca Cornell (1622-1713)

Mother of Sarah Woosley

Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)

Father of Rebecca Cornell

Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)

Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.

Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)

Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.

Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)

Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.

Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)

Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.

Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)

Son of Elijah Cornell

John Cornell (1788-1860)

Son of Ezra Cornell

Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)

Son of John Cornell

Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)

Son of Harrison Cornell

George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)

Son of Lafayette Cornell

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of George Everett Cornell

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Mary Alice Cornell


 In 2004, Kerry won the Democratic nomination for president. He focused much of his campaign efforts on criticizing President George W. Bush. Kerry opposed Bush's foreign policy, particularly in its handling of the Iraq war. Though Kerry voted to give the president authority to wage war in Iraq, he subsequently voted against an $87 billion aid package for the country. Kerry reasons that Bush misused the trust that Congress placed in him, and continues to criticize the president for "squandering the goodwill of the world after September 11."

In July, Kerry chose North Carolina senator and former trial lawyer John Edwards as his running mate. Later that month, Kerry and Edwards were joined by speakers Bill and Hillary Clinton, Jimmy Carter, Madeline Albright and others at the Democratic National Convention in Boston. In November 2004, after a hard-fought and often bitter campaign, Kerry conceded the presidential election to incumbent George W. Bush.

Secretary of State

After his failed presidential bid, Kerry continued to be a strong presence in the U.S. Senate. He became chairman of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee in 2009. In 2011, Kerry was asked to help sort out the nation's fiscal problems as a member of the Joint Select Committee on Deficit Reduction.

In December 2012, President Barack Obama nominated Kerry to be his next secretary of state. Kerry succeeded Hillary Clinton who previously held the post. Obama considered Kerry to be the ideal candidate for the job with his decades of political experience. "John's played a central role in every major foreign policy debate for nearly 30 years," Obama said in a press conference, according to CNN.

Kerry's nomination was approved by the vast majority of the Senate with a 94 to 3 vote on January 29, 2013. His years on experience with matters of foreign policy will prove to be a great asset for his new job. As his fellow Democrat, Senator Bob Menendez, explained, "Kerry will need no introduction to the world's political and military leaders." The new secretary of state "will begin Day 1 fully conversant not only with the intricacies of U.S. foreign policy, but able to act on a multitude of international stages," Menendez added, according to a report by The Associated Press.

One of Kerry's great challenges as secretary of state has been the conflict in Syria between rebels and the government led by Bashar al-Assad. In late August 2013, he confirmed that chemical weapons had been used on civilians by al-Assad's forces. The use of these weapons "defies any code of morality," Kerry told the press, according to U.S. News & World Report. "The indiscriminate slaughter of civilians, the killing of women and children and innocent bystanders by chemical weapons is a moral obscenity." Kerry warned that President Obama believes that the Syrian government must be held accountable for this brutal and senseless act.

Following Obama's announcement in regards to the likelihood of a strike on Syria by the U.S., Russia—among other nations—agreed to negotiate a plan to have Syria release its chemical weapons. Kerry made an announcement during a joint press conference with Russian diplomat Sergey Lavrov on September 10, 2013, saying that the negotiations for a deal with Syria were underway, and while there were many expectations within the agreement, it was still a solution that he believed could be reached. However, he also expressed that the U.S. taking military action against Syria was still an option.

Later that month, Kerry met the Iranian foreign minister Mohammad Javad Zarif. This marked the first time in years that high-ranking officials from the two countries had engaged in talks. This move, along with letters exchanged between President Barack Obama and Iranian leader Hassan Rouhani, may indicate a possible thawing in U.S.-Iranian relations.

Kerry's diplomatic efforts with Iran began to pay off in November 2013. The United States reached an agreement with Iran regarding its nuclear program. In this deal, Iran has pledged to curb its uranium enrichment program in exchange for an easing of sanctions against Iran. On the television programState of the Union, Kerry answered critics, such as Israel, of this accord. "We believe very strongly that because the Iranian nuclear program is actually set backwards and is actually locked into place in critical places, that that is better for Israel than if you were just continuing to go down the road and they rush towards a nuclear weapon," he said.

Personal Life

In 1995, Kerry married Teresa Heinz, who is the widow of former Senator John Heinz and heir to the Heinz fortune. Kerry has two daughters from a previous marriage, Alexandra and Vanessa. Teresa has three sons, John, Andre and Christopher. The couple lives in Boston.

 

 

 Thomas Richard Carper

(1947-)

6th Cousin 1x Removed

United States Senator of Delaware




Wallace Richard Carper (1919-1992)

Father of Thomas Richard Carper

Franklin Pierce Carper (1889-1958)

Father of Wallace Richard Carper

Samuel Harrington Walker Carper (1847-1927)

Father of Franklin Pierce Carper

Joseph W. Carper Sr. (1802-1880)

Father of Samuel Harrington Walker Carper

Isaac Carper (1777-1838)

Father of Joseph W. Carper Sr.

Johann Jacob Carper (1748-1829)

Father of Isaac Carper

Margaretha Barbara Marsteller (1709-1758)

Mother of Johann Jacob Carper

Nicholas Carper (1749-1813)

Father of Margaretha Barbara Marsteller

Jacob Carper (1774-1827)

Son of Nicholas Carper

Nicholas Carper II (1799-1886)

Son of Jacob Carper

Miles Monroe Carper (1846-1927)

Son of Nicholas Carper

Walter Van Buren Carper (1873-1952)

Son of Miles Monroe Carper

Eva Sue Carper (1897-1973)

Daughter of Walter Van Buren Carper

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of Eva Sue Carper

Eric Glosser

Son of Mary Alice Cornell


 Born in West Virginia and raised in Virginia, Senator Tom Carper attended The Ohio State University on a Navy R.O.T.C. scholarship, graduating in 1968 with a B.A. in economics. He went on to complete five years of service as a naval flight officer, serve three tours of duty in Southeast Asia during the Vietnam War, and continued to serve in the Naval Reserve as a P-3 aircraft mission commander until retiring with the rank of captain in 1991 after 23 years of military service. With the war winding down in Southeast Asia, Tom Carper moved to Delaware in 1973 where he earned his M.B.A. at the University of Delaware.

His career in public service began in 1976 when he was elected to the first of three terms as Delaware's state treasurer at the age of 29 at a time when the state of Delaware had the worst credit rating of any state in America. Six years later, with that credit rating restored to a respectable "AA," he ran for – and was elected – to Delaware's at-large seat in the U.S. House of Representatives.

After serving five terms as a U.S. congressman, where he earned a reputation as a results-oriented centrist, Tom Carper was elected the 78th governor of Delaware in 1992 and served two terms in that role. As governor, he pursued a common-sense agenda that led to eight balanced budgets, tax cuts in seven of those eight years, and major increases in employment. Governor Carper led the effort to strengthen the state's “rainy day” fund and boost Delaware's credit rating to "AAA" for the first time in state history, while helping to overhaul the state's education system and to implement welfare reform initiatives in Delaware and the nation.

During his second term as governor, Tom Carper was selected by his colleagues to serve as vice-chairman, then as chairman, of the National Governors' Association (NGA). After serving as chairman, he led the NGA's 'Center for Best Practices,' which focused on developing and implementing innovative solutions to policy challenges faced by governors across the nation. From 1994-1998, he served as a member of Amtrak's board of directors and, later, as founding vice-chairman of the American Legacy Foundation to combat youth smoking and as vice-chairman of Jobs for America's Graduates, a national non-profit to reduce high school dropouts.

On Jan. 3, 2001, Governor Carper stepped down two weeks early to become Delaware's junior senator. He was reelected in 2006, and with his reelection in November 2012 he has been elected to state-wide public office in Delaware 13 times. When Senator Joe Biden stepped down to become vice president in January 2009, Tom Carper became Delaware's senior senator.

Senator Carper is ranking member of the Senate Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, after serving as chairman in the 113th Congress. In that capacity, he focuses on protecting our country from threats to our national security as well as ensuring federal government programs are efficient and using taxpayer dollars wisely. Additionally, he is fighting to save the U.S. Postal Service and to strengthen our nation's cybersecurity. He also serves on the Finance Committee and Environment and Public Works Committee, where he is ranking member on the Subcommittee on Clean Air and Nuclear Safety.

In his time in the U.S. Senate, Senator Carper has worked extensively on reforming our health care system, improving our environment, and ensuring that federal programs are run efficiently and effectively. As a member of the Senate Finance Committee, Senator Carper helped craft the Affordable Care Act with a focus on how to improve our health care system by reducing costs, getting better results, and empowering consumers with the tools and resources they need to achieve better health and wellness. Senator Carper fought to include provisions on workplace wellness and menu labeling in the health care reform law, and he continues to be a leader in ensuring that the Affordable Care Act is implemented effectively. As a member of the Environment and Public Works Committee, Senator Carper fought to protect our environment and clean up our air. He successfully defended common sense clean air regulations from misguided attempts to repeal them, and he continues to push for meaningful protections that limit carbon pollution, regulate cross-state air pollution and help stem the tide of climate change. He led the effort to pass the Diesel Emissions Reduction Act with Sen. George Voinovich (R-Ohio) which has cleaned up millions of old, dirty diesel engines to help save lives and improve public health, and he helped broker the compromise that created our country’s highest fuel efficiency standards in a generation, saving Americans millions at the pump.  All in all, he worked to advocate for common sense policies to clean our air, reduce our dependence on fossil fuels, and improve public health.  As ranking member of the Homeland Security and Governmental Affairs Committee, he continues to champion postal reform with the goal of protecting the U.S. Postal Service from collapse and ensuring it remains a robust American institution for generations to come.  He has also coauthored legislation to help reduce the number of mistake payments made by the federal government and to enhance the federal government’s transparency efforts. 

During more than 30 years of public service, Senator Carper has worked tirelessly to develop practical solutions to real problems. His ability to work across party lines has earned him a reputation for consensus-building that is unique in today's political climate. The Washington Post's late David Broder calls him "a notably effective and non-partisan leader, admired and trusted on both sides of the aisle."



 

 

 William Henry “Bill” Gates III

(1955-)

10th Cousin 2x Removed

Microsoft Founder / Billionaire



Mary A. Maxwell (1929-1994)

Mother of William Henry “Bill” Gates III

James Willard Maxwell Jr. (1901-1960)

Father of Mary A. Maxwell

James Willard Maxwell Sr. (1864-1951)

Father of James Willard Maxwell Jr.

Louisa Mary Woodworth (1842-1900)

Mother of James Willard Maxwell Sr.

Emeline Keeler Brush (1821-1901)

Mother of Louisa Mary Woodworth

George Phillips Brush (1775-1829)

Father of Emeline Keeler Brush

Hannah Phillips (1752-1839)

Mother of George Phillips Brush

Samuel Phillips (1728-1805)

Father of Hannah Phillips

George Phillips Jr. (1698-1771)

Father of Samuel Phillips

Sarah Elizabeth Hallett (1672-1730)

Mother of George Phillips Jr.

Sarah Woosley (1650-1727)

Mother of Sarah Elizabeth Hallett

Rebecca Cornell (1622-1713)

Mother of Sarah Woosley

Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)

Father of Rebecca Cornell

Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)

Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.

Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)

Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.

Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)

Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.

Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)

Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.

Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)

Son of Elijah Cornell

John Cornell (1788-1860)

Son of Ezra Cornell

Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)

Son of John Cornell

Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)

Son of Harrison Cornell

George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)

Son of Lafayette Cornell

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of George Everett Cornell

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Mary Alice Cornell


 

Personal Life

In 1989, a 28-year-old Microsoft executive named Melinda French caught the eye of Bill Gates, then 37. The very bright and organized Melinda was a perfect match for Gates. In time, their relationship grew as they discovered an intimate and intellectual connection. On January 1, 1994, Melinda and Bill were married in Hawaii. But only a few months later heartbreak struck Bill Gates as his mother was diagnosed with breast cancer. She died in June 1994. Gates was devastated.

Bill and Melinda took some time off in 1995 to travel to several countries and get a new perspective on life and the world. In 1996, their first daughter, Jennifer, was born. A year later, Gates moved his family into a 55,000 square foot, $54 million house on the shore of Lake Washington. Though the house serves as a business center, it is said to be a very cozy home for the couple and their three children.

Philanthropic Efforts

With wife Melinda's influence, Gates took an interest in filling his mother's role as a civic leader. He began to realize that he had an obligation to give more of his wealth to charity. Being the consummate student he was, Gates studied the philanthropic work of Andrew Carnegie and John D. Rockefeller, titans of the American industrial revolution. In 1994, Gates and his wife established the William H. Gates Foundation which was dedicated to supporting education, world health, and investment in low-income communities. In 2000, the couple combined several family foundations to form the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. They started out by making a $28 billion contribution to set up the foundation.

Bill Gates stepped down from the day-to-day operations of Microsoft in 2000, turning over the job of CEO to college friend Steve Ballmer who had been with Microsoft since 1980. He positioned himself as chief software architect so he could concentrate on what was for him the more passionate side of the business. He still remains chairman of the board. Over the next few years, his involvement with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation occupied much of his time and even more of his interest. In 2006, Gates announced he was transitioning himself from full-time work at Microsoft, to devote more quality time to the Foundation. His last full day at Microsoft was June 27, 2008.

In addition to all the accolades of being one of the most successful and richest businessmen in the history of the world, Bill Gates has also received numerous awards for philanthropic work. Time magazine named Gates one of the most influential people of the 20th century. The magazine also named Gates, his wife Melinda, and rock band U2's lead singer Bono as the 2005 Persons of the Year.

Gates also holds several honorary doctorates from universities throughout the world and an honorary Knight Commander of the Order of the British Empire by Queen Elizabeth II. In 2006, Gates and his wife were awarded the Order of the Aztec Eagle by the Mexican government for their philanthropic work throughout the world in the areas of health and education.

In February 2014, Gates announced that he would be stepping down as chairman of Microsoft in order to move into a new position as technology adviser. In addition to Gates's transition, it was reported that longtime Microsoft CEO Steve Ballmer would be replaced by 46-year-old Satya Nadella.

 

 

 Norma Jean Baker (Marilyn Monroe)

(1926-1962)

7th Cousin 3x Removed

Movie Star


Charles Stanley Gifford (1898-1965)

Father of Norma Jean Baker (Marilyn Monroe)

Frederick Gifford (1865-1957)

Father of Charles Stanley Gifford

Susan Bateman Almy (1841-1908)

Mother of Frederick Gifford

Samuel Elam Almy (1800-1889)

Father of Susan Bateman Almy

Cooke Almy (1765-1861)

Father of Samuel Elam Almy

John Almy (1651-)

Father of Cooke Almy

Elizabeth Cornell (1637-1714)

Mother of John Almy

Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)

Father of Rebecca Cornell

Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)

Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.

Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)

Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.

Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)

Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.

Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)

Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.

Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)

Son of Elijah Cornell

John Cornell (1788-1860)

Son of Ezra Cornell

Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)

Son of John Cornell

Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)

Son of Harrison Cornell

George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)

Son of Lafayette Cornell

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of George Everett Cornell

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Mary Alice Cornell


 

 

Famed Career

Monroe's marriage to Dougherty fizzled out as she focused more on her career. The couple divorced in 1946—the same year that Monroe signed her first movie contract. With the movie contract came a new name and image; she began calling herself "Marilyn Monroe" and dyed her hair blonde. But her acting career didn't really take off until the 1950s. Her small part in John Huston's crime drama The Asphalt Jungle (1950) garnered her a lot of attention. That same year, she impressed audiences and critics alike with her performance as Claudia Caswell in All About Eve, starring Bette Davis. She would soon become one of Hollywood's most , about Monroe's relationship with Sir Laurence Olivier in 1957's The Prince and the Showgirl.

She would soon become one of Hollywood's most famous actresses; though she wasn't initially considered to be star acting material, she later proved her skill by winning various honors and attracting large audiences to her films.

In 1953, Monroe made a star-making turn in Niagara, starring as a young married woman out to kill her husband with help from her lover. The emerging sex symbol was paired with another bombshell, Jane Russell, for the musical comedy Gentlemen Prefer Blondes (1953). The film was a hit and Monroe continued to find success in a string of light comedic fare, such as How to Marry a Millionaire with Betty Grable and Lauren Bacall, There's No Business like Show Business (1954) with Ethel Merman and Donald O'Connor, andThe Seven Year Itch (1955).

"Being a sex symbol is a heavy load to carry, especially when one is tired, hurt and bewildered."

With her breathy voice and hourglass figure, Monroe became a much-admired international star, despite her chronic insecurities regarding her acting abilities. Monroe suffered from pre-performance anxiety that sometimes made her physically ill and was often the root cause of her legendary tardiness on films sets, which was so extreme that it often infuriated her co-stars and crew. "She would be the greatest if she ran like a watch," director Billy Wilder once said of her. "I have an aunt Minnie who's very punctual, but who would pay to see Aunt Minnie?" Throughout her career, Monroe was signed and released from several contracts with film studios.

Tired of bubbly, dumb blonde roles, Monroe moved to New York City to study acting with Lee Strasberg at the Actors' Studio. She returned to the screen in the dramatic comedy Bus Stop (1956), playing a saloon singer kidnapped by a rancher who has fallen in love with her. She received mostly praise for her performance.

In 1959, Monroe returned to familiar territory with the wildly popular comedySome Like It Hot, with Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis. She played Sugar Kane Kowalczyk, a singer who hopes to marry a millionaire in this humorous film, in which Lemmon and Curtis pretend to be women. They are on the run from the mob after witnessing the St. Valentine's Day Massacre and hide out with an all-girl orchestra featuring Monroe. Her work on the film earned her the honor of "Best Actress in a Comedy" in 1959, at Golden Globe Awards.

Reunited with John Huston, Monroe starred opposite Clark Gable and Montgomery Clift in The Misfits (1961). Set in Nevada, this adventure drama features Monroe, who falls for Gable's cowboy but battles him over the fate of some wild mustangs. This was her last completed film.

In 1962, Monroe was dismissed from Something's Got to Give—also starring Dean Martin—for missing so many days of filming. According to an article in The New York Times, the actress claimed that the absences were due to illness. Martin declined to make the film without her, so the studio shelved the picture.

At the time, Monroe's professional and personal life seemed to be in turmoil. Her last two films, Let's Make Love (1960) and The Misfits (1961) were box office disappointments.

"A career is wonderful, but you can't curl up with it on a cold night."

In her personal life, she had a string of unsuccessful marriages and relationships. Her 1954 marriage to baseball great Joe DiMaggio only lasted nine months (she wed playwright Arthur Miller from 1956 to 1961).

On May 19, 1962, Monroe made her now-famous performance at John F. Kennedy's birthday celebration, singing "Happy Birthday, Mr. President."

Death and Legacy

On August 5, 1962, at only 36 years old, Marilyn Monroe died at her Los Angeles home. An empty bottle of sleeping pills was found by her bed. There has been some speculation over the years that she may have been murdered, but the cause of her death was officially ruled as a drug overdose. There have been rumors that Monroe was involved with President John F. Kennedy and/or his brother Robert around the time of her death.

Monroe was buried in her favorite Emilio Pucci dress, in what was known as a "Cadillac casket"—the most high-end casket available, made of heavy-gauge solid bronze and lined with champagne-colored silk. Lee Strasberg delivered a eulogy before a small group of friends and family. Hugh Hefner bought the crypt directly next to Monroe's, and Monroe's ex-husband, Joe DiMaggio, famously had red roses delivered to her crypt for the next 20 years.

“She was the victim of ballyhoo and sensation — exploited beyond anyone’s means.” — Sir Laurence Olivier

Monroe did not own a house until the last year of her life, and had surprisingly few possessions. One that she prized was an autographed photo of Albert Einstein, which included an inscription: "To Marilyn, with respect and love and thanks."

During her career, Marilyn Monroe's films grossed more than $200 million. Today, she is still considered the world's most popular icon of sex appeal and beauty, and is remembered for her idiosyncratic sense of humor and sly wit; once asked by a reporter what she wore to bed, she replied, "Chanel Number 5." On another occasion, she was asked what she thought of Hollywood. "If I close my eyes and think of Hollywood, all I see is one big varicose vein," she replied. Monroe is also remembered for her romantic relationships with Marlon Brando, Frank Sinatra, Yves Montand and director Elia Kazan, in addition to her three marriages.

Monroe has been imitated over the years by a number of celebrities, including Madonna, Lady Gaga and Gwen Stefani. Actress Michelle Williams portrayed Monroe ina 2011 film, My Week with Marilyn, about Monroe's relationship with Sir Laurence Olivier in 1957's The Prince and the Showgirl.

In 2011, several rarely seen photos of Marilyn Monroe were published in a book of photographs by famed photographer Sam Shaw. August 5, 2012 marked the 50th anniversary of Monroe's death. Now more than a half century later, the world is still fascinated by her beauty and talent. 

 

Captain John Nathan Nelson


(1739-1814)

5th Great Grandfather

Major / Captain in the Revolutionary War




William Nelson (1776-1814)

Father of John Nathan Nelson

Peter Simeon Nelson (1809-1892)

Son of William Nelson

Peter R. Nelson (1854-1909)

Son of Peter Simeon Nelson

Harry Lester Nelson (1889-1970)

Son of Peter R. Nelson

Minnie Rosina Nelson (1906-1935)

Daughter of Harry Lester Nelson

Elmer Glosser Jr. (1929-2006)

Son of Minnie Rosina Nelson

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Elmer Glosser Jr.


 

 1776 -- Dec. 10, muster roll of Captain John Nelson's Company of the First Battalion of Northampton County Militia, commanded by Colonel George Taylor, listed both John Crawford and Thomas Moor (witness from John Sr's will), "Mustered on the Parade in Newtown, Bucks county, 22d January, 1777, Capt'n John Nelson's Company of Militia of Northampton, Commanded by Colonel George Taylor, one Captain, two Lieutenants, one Ensign, four Sergeants, three Corporals, one Drummer, and thirty-two Privates. LOD'K SPROGELL, M. M. G. of P." ref. Pa. Archives, 5th series, v 8.

 

 

Milton Snavely Hershey


(1857-1945)

3rd Cousin 3x Removed

Hershey Chocolate Founder


Henry H. Hershey (1829-1904)

Father of Milton Snavely Hershey

Jacob Franz Hershey (1802-1877)

Father of Henry H. Hershey

Isaac Hernley Hershey (1773-1831)

Father of Jacob Franz Hershey

Christian Hershey (1719-1782)

Father of Isaac Hernley Hershey

Benjamin Hershey (1768-1842)

Father of Christian Heshey

Catherine Hershey (1802-1875)

Daughter of Benjamin Hershey

Nancy Ellen Wolford (1848-1912)

Daughter of Catherine Hershey

Cora Belle Wyatt (1879-1926)

Daughter of Nancy Ellen Wolford

Elmer Harrison Glosser (1902-1934)

Son of Cora Belle Wyatt

Elmer Glosser Jr. (1929-2006)

Son of Elmer Harrison Glosser

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Elmer Glosser Jr.


 

 Milton Hershey was born on September 13, 1857, in Derry Township, Pennsylvania, although some sources say he was born in Derry Church, Pennsylvania. Following an incomplete rural school education, Hershey was apprenticed at age 15. After two failed attempts, Hershey set up the Lancaster Caramel Co. In 1900 Hershey sold the company, focused on perfecting the formula for chocolate bars, and began building at the site that became the world’s largest chocolate manufacturing plant.

Early Years

Entrepreneur Milton Snavely Hershey was born on September 13, 1857, in Derry Township, Pennsylvania. He was the only surviving child of Veronica "Fanny" Snavely and Henry Hershey. Born on a farm outside of Derry Church, Pennsylvania—a small farming community in the central part of the state—Hershey spent the early years of his childhood trailing his father, a dreamer who always had his eye out for the next big opportunity. But Henry Hershey lacked the perseverance and work ethic to stick anything out.

By 1867, Hershey's father had largely cut himself out of the family picture. The details around his parents' separation are cloudy, but it's largely believed that Fanny, the daughter of a Mennonite clergyman, had grown tired of her husband's failures.

With Hershey's upbringing left to her, the strict Fanny instilled in her son an appreciation for hard work. At the age of 14, Hershey, who'd dropped out of school the year before, expressed an interest in candy making and began apprenticing with a master confectioner in Lancaster, Pennsylvania. Four years later, Hershey borrowed $150 from his aunt and set up his own candy shop in the heart of Philadelphia.

Early Ventures

For five long years Hershey poured his sweat and time into the business. But success eluded him. Finally, he closed shop and headed west, reuniting with his father in Denver, where he found work with a confectioner. It was there that he discovered caramel and how fresh milk could be used to make it.

But the entrepreneur in Hershey wasn't content to work for someone else, and he struck out on his own again, first in Chicago and later in New York City. In both cases, Hershey again failed. In 1883, he returned to Lancaster and, still convinced he could build a successful candy company, started the Lancaster Caramel Company.

Success soon followed. Within a few short years, Hershey had a thriving business and was shipping his caramels all over the country.

The Chocolate King

At the World's Columbian Exposition in Chicago in 1893, Hershey got an up-close look at the art of chocolate making. He was immediately hooked. While his caramel business boomed, Hershey started the Hershey Chocolate Company.

His fascination quickly became focused on milk chocolate, considered a delicacy and largely the domain of the Swiss. Hershey was determined to find a new formula that would allow him to mass-produce and mass-distribute milk chocolate candy.

In 1900 he sold the Lancaster Caramel Company for an astonishing $1 million. Three years later he began building a mammoth and modern candy-making facility in Derry Church. It opened in 1905, setting a new course for Hershey and the candy industry.

Man of the People

Quickly, the Hershey Chocolate Company's success far exceeded that of its founder's previous venture. His winning ideas included the Hershey Kiss in 1907, which the company's founder named himself. The trademark foil wrapper was added in 1924.

As the company grew and Hershey's wealth expanded, so did his vision for creating a model community in his home region. In the town that came to be known as Hershey, Pennsylvania, Hershey built schools, parks, churches, recreational facilities and housing for his employees. He even added a trolley system for his workers.

At his side for much of this philanthropy was his wife, Catherine, whom he'd married in 1898. Unable to have children of their own, the Hersheys focused a good portion of their giving on endeavors that affected kids. In 1909 the couple opened the Hershey Industrial School, a facility for orphaned boys. It has since become a landing spot for girls as well and is now known as the Milton Hershey School.

In 1918, three years after Catherine's unexpected death, Hershey transferred much of his wealth, which included his ownership of the Hershey Chocolate Company, to the Hershey Trust, which funds the Hershey School.

Hershey's philanthropy kept going even when the economy struggled and he was nearing the end of his life. In the 1930s, during the Great Depression, Hershey ignited a building mini-boom in his town in order to keep men working. He ordered the construction of a large hotel, a community building and new offices for the Hershey Company.

During World War II, Hershey backed the country's military efforts by supplying forces with chocolate bars called the Ration D Bar and the better-tasting Tropical Chocolate Bar.

To those who knew Hershey, his generosity wasn't surprising. Shy and reserved, Hershey's quiet demeanor contrasted greatly with many of America's other business titans. While he seldom wrote or read, and had been forced to leave school early, Hershey was driven to make sure those around him received a great education. His display of wealth was rather modest, if not downright thrifty. His house and the community he'd helped create meant everything to him. When it came to building his own home, he made sure the Hershey Company headquarters was part of the view.

Final Years

Following his wife Catherine's death, Hershey never remarried and supposedly carried a picture of his late wife wherever he traveled. In keeping with the work ethic his mother instilled in him, Hershey continued to work well into his 80s. He died in Hershey, Pennsylvania, on October 13, 1945.

His legacy as a businessman and philanthropist continues to this day. The Hershey Chocolate Company has endured as one of the world's great candy makers, with brands that include Almond Joy, Mounds, Cadbury, Reese's and Twizzler.

Just as impressive, the Milton Hershey School now serves about 1,900 students each year, while the M.S. Hershey Foundation, which Hershey established in 1935, funds educational and cultural activities for Hershey residents.



 

 

 Benjamin Franklin

(1706-1790)

1st Cousin 4x Removed of Wife of 4th Great Grand Uncle

United States of America Founding Father




Abiah Lee Folger (1667-1752)

Mother of Benjamin Franklin

Mary Morrill (1620-1704)

Mother of Abiah Lee Folger

Eleazer Folger (1648-1716)

Son of Mary Morrill

Sarah Folger (1676-1732)

Daughter of Eleazer Folger

Elizabeth Odar (1703-1784)

Daughter of Sarah Folger

Elizabeth Mooers (1723-1804)

Daughter of Elizabeth Odar

Phebe Coleman (1745-1818)

Daughter of Elizabeth Mooers

Eunice Barnard (1788-1857)

Daughter of Phebe Coleman

Elijah Cornell Jr. (1771-1862)

Husband of Eunice Barnard

Elijah Cornell Sr. (1730-1777)

Father of Elijah Cornell Jr.

Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)

Son of Elijah Cornell Sr.

John Cornell (1788-1860)

Son of Ezra Cornell

Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)

Son of John Cornell

Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)

Son of Harrison Cornell

George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)

Son of Lafayette Cornell

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of George Everett Cornell

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Mary Alice Cornell


 Born in Boston in 1706, Benjamin Franklin organized the United States’ first lending library and volunteer fire department. His scientific pursuits included investigations into electricity, mathematics and mapmaking. He helped draft the Declaration of Independence and the U.S Constitution, and negotiated the 1783 Treaty of Paris, which marked the end of the Revolutionary War.

Early Life

Benjamin Franklin was born on January 17, 1706, in Boston in what was then known as the Massachusetts Bay Colony. His father, Josiah Franklin, a soap and candle maker, had 17 children, seven with first wife, Anne Child, and 10 with second wife Abiah Folger. Benjamin was his 15th child and the last son.

Despite his success at the Boston Latin School, Ben was removed at 10 to work with his father at candle making, but dipping wax and cutting wicks didn’t fire his imagination. Perhaps to dissuade him from going to sea as one of his brothers had done, Josiah apprenticed Ben at 12 to his brother James at his print shop. Ben took to this like a duck to water, despite his brother’s hard treatment. When James refused to publish any of his brother’s writing, Ben adopted the pseudonym Mrs. Silence Dogood, and “her” 14 imaginative and witty letters were published in his brother’s newspaper, The New England Courant, to the delight of the readership. But James was angry when it was discovered the letters were his brother’s, and Ben abandoned his apprenticeship shortly afterward, escaping to New York, but settling in Philadelphia, which was his home base for the rest of his life.

Franklin furthered his education in the printing trade in Philadelphia, lodging at the home of John Read in 1723, where he met and courted Read’s daughter Deborah. Nevertheless, the following year, Franklin left for London under the auspices of Pennsylvania Governor William Keith, but felt duped when letters of introduction never arrived and he was forced to find work at print shops there. Once employed, though, he was able to take full advantage of the city’s pleasures, attending theater, mingling with the populace in coffee houses and continuing his lifelong passion for reading. He also managed to publish his first pamphlet, "A Dissertation upon Liberty and Necessity, Pleasure and Pain."

Franklin returned to Philadelphia in 1726 to find that Deborah Read had married. In the next few years he held varied jobs such as bookkeeper, shopkeeper and currency cutter. He also fathered a son, William, out of wedlock during this time. In late 1727, Franklin formed the “Junto,” a social and self-improvement study group for young men, and early the next year was able to establish his own print shop with a partner.

Prominent Citizen

After publishing another pamphlet, "The Nature and Necessity of a Paper Currency," Franklin was able to purchase The Pennsylvania Gazettenewspaper from a former boss, and was elected the official printer of Pennsylvania. He was also able to take Deborah Read as his common-law wife in 1730, after her husband disappeared after stealing a slave. Their first son, Francis, was born in 1732 (although he died four years later of smallpox).

Franklin’s prominence and success grew during the 1730s, especially with the publication of Poor Richard’s Almanack at the end of 1732. Franklin amassed real estate and businesses, organized the Union Fire Company to counteract dangerous fire hazards, established a lending library so others could share his passion for reading, and was elected Grand Master of the Pennsylvania Masons, clerk of the state assembly and postmaster of Philadelphia.

The 1740s saw Franklin expanding into entrepreneurship with invention of the Franklin stove, and also into scientific pursuits. His pamphlet "A Proposal for Promoting Useful Knowledge" underscored his interests. His beloved daughter Sarah was born in 1743. He became a soldier in the Pennsylvania militia at the age of 42, but his abiding interest in electricity was ignited at this time, too. He conducted the famous kite-and-key experiment in 1752 after some of his theories on electricity were published in England the previous year.

Public Service

Franklin was tapped as a foreign diplomat and represented the Pennsylvania Assembly, and subsequently Massachusetts, Georgia and New Jersey, in England, but he continued to work toward colonial union and in 1766 supported the repeal of the Stamp Act.

In 1775, Franklin was elected to the Second Continental Congress and as postmaster general for the colonies, having mapped the postal routes in 1762. And in 1776, he was one of five men to draft the Declaration of Independence. Franklin was also one of the 13 men who drafted the Articles of Confederation.

Later Years

Much has been made of Franklin’s life in Paris as essentially the first U.S. ambassador to France, chiefly his romantic life. Deborah, his wife of 44 years, died in 1774, two years before he accepted the post, and Franklin had a rich romantic life in his nine years abroad. He even proposed marriage, to a widow named Madame Helvetius, at the age of 74, but she rejected him.

Franklin was embraced in France as much, if not more, for his intellectual standing in the scientific community and for his wit, as for his status as a political appointee from a fledging country. His reputation facilitated respect and entrees into closed communities, including that of King Louis XVI. And it was his adept diplomacy that led to the peace treaty with England in 1783 and other foreign alliances and trade treaties.

After almost a decade in France, Franklin returned to America in 1785. He was elected to represent Pennsylvania at the Constitutional Convention, which drafted and ratified the new U.S Constitution, and participated in electing George Washington as the country’s first president, inaugurated in April 1789.

He also served as president of the Pennsylvania Society for Promoting the Abolition of Slavery, wrote many tracts urging the abolition of slavery and petitioned the U.S Congress for it in 1790.

Successes and Failures

With so many of America’s early heroes, successes take the spotlight, while failures are rarely mentioned. But with any great entrepreneur the failures are just paving stones to the triumphs. Franklin himself said, “Do not fear mistakes. You will know failure. Continue to reach out.”

He took his own advice. Franklin mapped the Gulf Stream, invented swim fins, the lightning rod and musical instruments, established colleges, and amassed scores of other accomplishments. His self-education earned him honorary degrees from Harvard, Yale, Oxford University in England, and the University of St. Andrews in Scotland.

But he also began a magazine that failed, devised a new “scheme” for the alphabet that proposed to eliminate the letters C, J, Q, W, X and Y as redundant, and made disastrous political decisions that involved the leaking of letters, called the “Hutchinson Affair.” He also made an ill-advised recommendation for Pennsylvania’s stamp distribution that caused the public to misconstrue where he stood on American support. His own son William, whom he helped to achieve the governorship of New Jersey, opposed him on the unification of the colonies, which stung Franklin to the point where he mentioned it in his will almost 25 years later.

Franklin’s voracious capacity for knowledge, investigation and finding practical solutions to problems was his primary focus, as was his commitment to “doing good,” which led to the concept of paying it forward.

Death and Legacy

Benjamin Franklin died on April 17, 1790, in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, at the home of his daughter, Sarah Bache. He was 84, suffered from gout and had complained of ailments for some time, completing the final codicil to his will a little more than a year and a half prior to his death. Franklin had actually written his epitaph when he was 22: The body of B. Franklin, Printer (Like the Cover of an Old Book Its Contents torn Out And Stript of its Lettering and Gilding) Lies Here, Food for Worms. But the Work shall not be Lost; For it will (as he Believ'd) Appear once More In a New and More Elegant Edition Revised and Corrected By the Author. In the end, however, the stone on the grave he shared with his wife read simply, “Benjamin and Deborah Franklin 1790.”

The image of Benjamin Franklin that has come down through history, along with the image on the $100 bill, is something of a caricature—a bald man in a frock coat holding a kite string with a key attached. But the scope of things he applied himself to was so broad it seems a shame. Founding universities and libraries, the post office, shaping the foreign policy of the fledgling United States, drafting the Declaration of Independence, publishing newspapers, warming us with the Franklin stove, pioneering advances in science, letting us see with bifocals and, yes, lighting our way with electricity—all from a man who never finished school but shaped his life through abundant reading and experience, a strong moral compass and an unflagging commitment to civic duty, and an overall wit, good humor and integrity. Franklin illumined corners of American life that still have the lingering glow of his attention. He was a true polymath and entrepreneur, which is no doubt why he is often called the First American. Perhaps it is a fitting image after all.



 

 

 Ezra Cornell

(1807-1874)

1st Cousin 5x Removed

Founder of Cornell University



Elijah Cornell Jr. (1771-1862)

Father of Ezra Cornell

Elijah Cornell Sr. (1730-1777)

Father of Elijah Cornell Jr.

Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)

Son of Elijah Cornell Sr.

John Cornell (1788-1860)

Son of Ezra Cornell

Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)

Son of John Cornell

Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)

Son of Harrison Cornell

George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)

Son of Lafayette Cornell

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of George Everett Cornell

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Mary Alice Cornell


 He was born in Westchester Landing, in what would become the Bronx, New York, the son of Eunice (Barnard), and a potter, Elijah Cornell, and was raised nearDeRuyter, New York.[1] He was a cousin of Paul Cornell, the founder of Chicago's Hyde Park neighborhood. Cornell was also a distant relative of William Cornell, who was an early settler of Scarborough, Ontario whose name was used for the planned community of Cornell, Ontario. Having traveled extensively as a carpenter in New York State, Ezra, upon first setting eyes on Cayuga Lake and Ithaca, decided Ithaca would be his future home.

Ezra Cornell's earliest American patrilineal ancestor, Thomas Cornell (settler) (1595-1673), was probably Puritan at first then a follower of Roger Williams and Anne Hutchinson drifting into Quakerism which seems to have been the religion of his descendants.[2][3] [4] Portsmouth, RI is noteworthy in American history for the 1638Portsmouth Compact declaring for a separation of church and state rivaling the Flushing Remonstrance of 1657 declaring for religious tolerance in New Amsterdam, Quakers in particular.

After settling in at Ithaca, Cornell quickly went to work proving himself as a carpenter. Colonel Beebe took notice of the industrious young man and made him the manager of his mill at Fall Creek.

Ezra Cornell was a birthright Quaker, but was later disowned by the Society of Friends for marrying outside of the faith to a "world's woman," a Methodist by the name of Mary Ann Wood. Ezra and Mary Ann were married March 19, 1831, in Dryden, New York.

On February 24, 1832, Ezra Cornell wrote the following response to his expulsion from The Society of Friends due to his marriage to Mary Ann Wood:

I have always considered that choosing a companion for life was a very important affair and that my happiness or misery in this life depended on the choice…

The young and growing family needed more income than could be earned as manager of Beebe's Mills. So, having purchased rights in a patent for a new type of plow, Ezra began what would be decades of traveling away from Ithaca. His territories for sales of the plow were the states of Maine and Georgia. His plan was to sell in Maine in the summer and the milder Georgia in the winter. With limited means, what transported Ezra between the two states were his own two feet.

Happening into the offices of the Maine Farmer in 1842, Cornell saw an acquaintance of his, one F.O.J. Smith, bent over some plans for a "scraper" as Smith called it. For services rendered, Smith had been granted a one-quarter share of the telegraph patent held by Samuel F.B. Morse, and was attempting to devise a way of burying the telegraph lines in the ground in lead pipe.[5] Ezra's knowledge of plows was put to the test and Ezra devised a special kind of plow that would dig a 2½ foot ditch, lay the pipe and telegraph wire in the ditch and cover it back up as it went. Later it was found that condensation in the pipes and poor insulationof the wires impeded the electrical current on the wires and so hanging the wire from telegraph poles became the accepted method.

Cornell made his fortune in the telegraph business as an associate of Samuel Morse, having gained his trust by constructing and stringing the telegraph poles between Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, Maryland, as the first ever telegraph line of substance in the U.S. To address the problem of telegraph lines shorting out to the ground, Cornell invented the idea of using glass insulators at the point where telegraph lines are connected to supporting poles. After joining with Morse, Cornell supervised the erection of many telegraph lines, including a portion of the New York, Albany & Buffalo line in 1846 and the Erie and Michigan Telegraph Company connecting Buffalo to Milwaukee with partners John James Speed and Francis Ormand Jonathan Smith. Cornell, Speed and Smith also built the New York and Erie line competing with and paralleling to the south the New York, Albany and Buffalo line in which Morse had a major share.[6] The line was completed in 1849 and Cornell was made president of the company.
Cornell's sister Phoebe married Martin B. Wood and moved to Albion, Michigan, in 1848. Cornell gave Wood a job constructing new lines and made Phoebe his telegraph operator, the first woman operator in the United States.[7]
Cornell earned a substantial fortune when the Erie and Michigan was consolidated with Hiram Sibley and his New York and Mississippi Company to form the Western Union company.[8] Cornell received two million in Western Union stock.[9]

Cornell was a Republican member of the New York State Assembly (Tompkins Co.) in 1862 and 1863; and of the New York State Senate from 1864 to 1867, sitting in the 87th88th89th and 90th New York State Legislatures.

Cornell retired from Western Union and turned his attention to philanthropy. He endowed the Cornell Library, a public library for the citizens of Ithaca. A lifelong enthusiast of science and agriculture, he saw great opportunity in the 1862 Morrill Land-Grant Colleges Act to found a university that would teach practical subjects on an equal basis with the classics favored by more traditional institutions. Andrew Dickson Whitehelped secure the new institution's status as New York's land grant university, and Cornell University was granted a charter through their efforts in 1865. Ezra Cornell entered the railroad business, but fared poorly due to the Panic of 1873. He began construction of a palatial Ithaca mansion, Llenroc (Cornell spelled in reverse) to replace his farmhouse, Forest Home, but died before it was completed. Llenroc was maintained by Cornell's heirs for several decades until being sold to the local chapter of the Delta Phi fraternity, which occupies it to this day; Forest Home was sold to the Delta Tau Delta chapter and later demolished. Cornell is interred in Sage Chapel on Cornell'scampus, along with Daniel Willard Fiske and Jennie McGraw. Cornell was originally laid to rest in Lake View Cemetery, Ithaca N.Y., then moved to Sage Chapel.

A prolific letter writer, Ezra corresponded with a great many people and would write dozens of letters each week. This was due partly to his wide traveling, and also to the many business associates he maintained during his years as an entrepreneur and later as a politician and university founder. Cornell University has made the approximately 30,000 letters in the Cornell Correspondenceavailable online.

His eldest son, Alonzo B. Cornell, was later governor of New York. Since its founding, the University's charter specified that the eldest lineal descendent of Cornell is granted a life seat on Cornell University's Board of Trustees,[10] currently Ezra Cornell IV. (Since Ezra Cornell IV took the post on November 17, 1969,[11] the law was amended, not now specifying the "eldest male lineal descendant.")

In 1990, G. David Low, graduate of Cornell University and Space Shuttle astronaut, took with him into outer space a pair of tan silk socks worn by Ezra Cornell on his wedding day in 1831



 

 

 Alonzo Barton Cornell

(1832-1904)

2nd Cousin 4x Removed

Governor of New York 1880



Ezra Cornell (1807-1874)

Father of Alonzo Barton Cornell

Elijah Cornell Jr. (1771-1862)

Father of Ezra Cornell

Elijah Cornell Sr. (1730-1777)

Father of Elijah Cornell Jr.

Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)

Son of Elijah Cornell Sr.

John Cornell (1788-1860)

Son of Ezra Cornell

Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)

Son of John Cornell

Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)

Son of Harrison Cornell

George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)

Son of Lafayette Cornell

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of George Everett Cornell

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Mary Alice Cornell


 ALONZO B. CORNELL, the thirtieth governor of New York, was born in Ithaca, New York on January 22, 1832. His education was attained at Ithaca Academy. As a teenager, he worked as a telegraph operator, and eventually became the vice president and director of the Western Union Telegraph Company. He also was a successful steamboat owner and banker. Cornell first entered politics as an unsuccessful candidate for the lieutenant governorship in the 1868 election. From 1870 to 1878 he chaired the New York Republican State Central Committee; and in 1873 he served as a member and speaker of the New York House of Representatives. He also served as the surveyor of customs in New York City, a post he held from 1876 to 1878. Cornell next secured the Republican gubernatorial nomination, and was elected governor by a popular vote on November 4, 1879. During his tenure, a women's reformatory in Hudson was organized; a state railroad commission was initiated; a state board of health was formed; women qualified for positions as school officers; and a corporation state tax law was sanctioned. After running unsuccessfully for reelection, Cornell retired from political life. Governor Alonzo B. Cornell passed away on October 15, 1904, and was buried in the Sage Chapel at Cornell University in Ithaca, New York.

Sources:

Sobel, Robert, and John Raimo, eds. Biographical Directory of the Governors of the United States, 1789-1978,Vol. 3, Westport, Conn.; Meckler Books, 1978. 4 vols.

 


 Daniel Robert Graham

(1936-)

9th Cousin 1x Removed

Governor of Florida from 1979 to 1987, US Senator from Florida from 1987 to Present



Hildah Elizabeth Simmons (1906-1976)

Mother of Daniel Robert Graham

Mary Ansley (1866-1940)

Mother of Hildah Elizabeth Simmons

Samuel Joseph Ansley (1839-1932)

Father of Mary Ansley

John Thomas Ansley (1808-1891)

Father of Samuel Joseph Ansley

Ann Morris (1772-1838)

Mother of John Thomas Ansley

Job Morris (1711-1767)

Father of Ann Morris

Richard Morris (1682-1741)

Father of Job Morris

Elizabeth Almy (1663-1711)

Mother of Richard Morris

Elizabeth Cornell (1637-1714)

Mother of Elizabeth Almy

Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)

Father of Elizabeth Cornell

Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)

Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.

Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)

Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.

Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)

Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.

Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)

Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.

Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)

Son of Elijah Cornell

John Cornell (1788-1860)

Son of Ezra Cornell

Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)

Son of John Cornell

Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)

Son of Harrison Cornell

George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)

Son of Lafayette Cornell

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of George Everett Cornell

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Mary Alice Cornell


 Senator from Florida; born in Coral Gables, Fla., November 9, 1936; attended the public schools of Dade County, Fla.; graduated, University of Florida, Gainesville 1959; graduated, Harvard Law School 1962; admitted to the Florida bar in 1962; builder and cattleman; elected to the Florida State house of representatives 1966; member, Florida State senate 1970-1978; governor of Florida 1979-1986; elected as a Democrat to the United States Senate in 1986; reelected in 1992 and 1998 and served from January 3, 1987, to January 3, 2005; chair, Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee (One Hundred Third Congress), Select Committee on Intelligence (One Hundred Seventh Congress [January 3-20, 2001; June 6, 2001-January 3, 2003]); was not a candidate for reelection to the Senate in 2004; was an unsuccessful candidate for Democratic nomination for president in 2004.

 

 

 

 James Atheran Folger Sr.

Founder of Folgers Coffee

4th Cousin 2x Removed of Wife of Great Grand Uncle

 The precursor of the Folger Coffee Company was founded in 1850 in San Francisco, California, U.S., as the Pioneer Steam Coffee and Spice Mills. In 1872 it was acquired and renamed by James A. Folger,[1] who had arrived from Nantucket Island at the age of 15 with his two older brothers during the California Gold Rush. In the 1850s, kerosene began to offer a cheaper alternative to whale oil, which had been Nantucket's life-blood, resulting in the re-purposing of many of its ships to bring coffee from South America to San Francisco.[2]

Under the mid-20th century leadership of his grandson Peter Folger the brand became one of the principal coffee concerns in the world's largest coffee market, North AmericaProcter & Gamble (P&G) acquired Folger's in 1963[3] and removed the apostrophe from its name.[citation needed]

P&G announced in January 2008 Folgers would be spun off into a separate Cincinnati-based company.[4] In June 2008, P&G reversed itself and announced Folgers would be acquired by the end of 2008 by The J.M. Smucker Company.[5][6] Utilizing a rare financial technique called a Reverse Morris Trust, Smucker purchased Folgers in November 2008 and made it a subsidiary.



 

 

 

 Abigail Anne Folger

(1943-1969)

4th Cousin 4x Removed of Wife or 4th Great Grand Uncle

Murdered with Sharon Tate by the Charles Manson Family

Was Heir to the Folger Coffee Empire



Peter Folger (1905-1980)

Father of Abigail Anne Folger

James Athearn Folger Jr. (1864-1921)

Father of Peter Folger

James Athearn Folger Sr. (1835-1889)

Father of James Athearn Folger Jr.

Samuel Brown Folger (1795-1864)

Father of James Athearn Folger Sr.

George Folger Jr. (1756-1809)

Father of Samuel Brown Folger

George Folger Sr. (1730-1813)

Father of George Folger Jr.

Abishai Folger (1700-1778)

Father of George Folger Sr.

Nathan Folger (1678-1747)

Father of Abishai Folger

Eleazer Folger (1648-1716

Father of Nathan Folger

Sarah Folger (1676-1732)

Daughter of Eleazer Folger

Elizabeth Odar (1703-1784)

Daughter of Sarah Folger

Elizabeth Mooers (1723-1804)

Daughter of Elizabeth Odar

Phebe Coleman (1745-1818)

Daughter of Elizabeth Mooers

Eunice Barnard (1788-1857)

Daughter of Phebe Coleman

Elijah Cornell Jr. (1771-1862)

Husband of Eunice Barnard

Elijah Cornell Sr. (1730-1777)

Father of Elijah Cornell Jr.

Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)

Son of Elijah Cornell Sr.

John Cornell (1788-1860)

Son of Ezra Cornell

Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)

Son of John Cornell

Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)

Son of Harrison Cornell

George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)

Son of Lafayette Cornell

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of George Everett Cornell

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Mary Alice Cornell


 

On the afternoon of August 8, 1969, Charles Manson set his plan in motion.  Calling together several Family members, Manson announced, "Now is the time for Helter Skelter."  That evening he told three female members of the Family--Susan AtkinsPatricia Krenwinkel, and Linda Kasabian--to get an additional change of clothes, a knife, and a driver's license.  Manson discussed details of his plan with a fourth Family member, Charles "Tex" Watson before all four piled into an old Ford.  As they drove down the driveway of the ranch, Manson stuck his head in the car window and told them "to leave a sign."  He said, "You girls know what I mean, something witchy."  Although Tex understood his mission fully, the three women knew neither their destination nor that the night was destined for murder.

Forty-five minutes or so later, shortly after midnight on August 9, the group pulled up in front of the Bel Air residence of actress Sharon Tate, famous for her recent role in the movie Valley of the Dolls.  Tate shared the home with her husband, director Roman Polanski, who was in London at the time working on his next film project, The Day of the Dolphin.  In his absence, two friends were staying at the large home at 10050 Cielo Drive, including coffee heiress Abigail Folger and her lover, Voytek Frykowski.  Also in the home that night was hair stylist Jay Sebring, a friend of Tate's.

After Tex cut the telephone wires leading to the Tate home, the four scrambled over the fence at the bottom of the property and began heading up the hill leading to the residence.  A car pulled up the driveway.  Tex leaped forward, stuck his hand through the car window, aimed at the driver's head, and pulled the trigger four times.  The first victim in the Tate-LaBianca killings was eighteen-year-oldSteven Parent, in the wrong place at the wrong time.  While Kasabian waited below by the car, the other three Family members entered the Tate home.  Within minutes, the screams began.  Watson would later describe the next four victims "as running around the place like chickens with their heads cut off."

In all, the four victims received 102 stab wounds.  Sharon Tate was the last to die, knived by Watson while she was held down by Susan Atkins.  Atkins said later that she tasted Tate's blood and found it to be "warm and sticky."  She took some of Tate's blood and used it to scrawl, on the porch wall, "PIG."

The next morning, a maid arriving at the Tate home left screaming, "Murder! Death! Bodies! Blood!"  Within hours, investigators discovered two badly mutilated bodies on the lawn of the Tate residence, those of Folger and Frykowski.  Inside, near a couch in the living room, they discovered the bloody pregnant body of Tate and, with a rope around his neck and a bloody towel over his face, Jay Sebring.

Manson, meanwhile, expressed his displeasure with the attack at the Tate residence.  Too messy, he thought.  He decided to accompany the next Helter Skelter mission, which he scheduled for that very night.  In addition to the four Family members from the previous night's mission, Manson was joined by Clem Tufts and Leslie Van Houten.  Manson ordered Kasabian to cruise the neighborhoods of Los Angeles, in search for potential victims, before settling on the home of Leno and and Rosemary LaBianca.  Watson, Krenwinkel, and Van Houten were the killers chosen by Manson.  As they left the car, Manson told them: "Don't let them know you are going to kill them."

Police found Leno LaBianca with a knife lodged in his throat, twelve stab wounds, and seven pairs of fork wounds.  The word "WAR" had been carved on his stomach.  Rosemary LaBianca was found with multiple stab wounds in her chest and neck.  On the LaBianca's living room wall, written in blood, were the words "DEATH TO PIGS"  and "RISE."  On the refrigerator door was written, "HEALTER SKELTER." 

 

 

 Elizabeth Andrew “Lizzie” Borden

(1860-1927)

6th Cousin 3x Removed

Infamous Murder Suspect


Andrew Jackson Borden (1822-1892)

Father of Lizzie Borden

Abraham Bowen Borden (1798-1882)

Father of Andrew Jackson Borden

Richard Borden Jr. (1748-1824)

Father of Abraham Bowen Borden

Richard Borden Sr. (1722-1795)

Father of Richard Borden Jr.

Thomas Borden (1697-1740)

Father of Richard Borden Sr.

Innocent Cornell (1673-1720)

Mother of Thomas Borden

Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)

Father of Innocent Cornell

Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)

Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.

Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)

Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.

Elijah Cornell Sr. (1730-1777)

Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.

Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)

Son of Elijah Cornell Sr.

John Cornell (1788-1860)

Son of Ezra Cornell

Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)

Son of John Cornell

Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)

Son of Harrison Cornell

George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)

Son of Lafayette Cornell

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of George Everett Cornell

Eric E. Glosser

Son of  Mary Alice Cornell


 

Lizzie was born in, and lived in, Fall River, Massachusetts. Her father was Andrew Borden, and her mother, Sarah, died when Lizzie was less than three years old. Lizzie had another sister, Emma, who was nine years older. Another daughter, between Emma and Lizzie, died in infancy.

Andrew Borden remarried in 1865. His second wife, Abby Durfree Gray, and the two sisters, Lizzie and Emma, lived mostly quietly and uneventfully, until 1892. Lizzie was active at church, including teaching Sunday School and membership in the Women's Christian Temperance Union (WCTU). In 1890, she traveled abroad briefly with some friends. 

Lizzie Borden's father had become comfortably wealthy, and was known as tight with his money. The house, while not small, had no modern plumbing. In 1884 when Andrew gave his wife's half-sister a house, his daughters objected and fought with their stepmother, refusing thereafter to call her "mother" and calling her simply "Mrs. Borden" instead. Andrew tried to make peace with his daughters, in 1887 giving them some funds and allowing them to rent out his old family home. In 1891, tensions in the family were strong enough that, after some apparent thefts from the master bedroom, each of the Bordens bought locks for their bedrooms.


In July of 1892, Lizzie and her sister Emma went to visit some friends; Lizzie returned and Emma remained away. In early August, Andrew and Abby Borden were struck with an attack of vomiting, and Mrs. Borden told someone that she suspected poison. The brother of Lizzie's mother came to stay at the house, and on August 4, this brother and Andrew Borden went into town together. Andrew returned alone and lay down in the sitting room.


Killings

The maid, who had earlier been ironing and washing windows, was taking a nap when Lizzie called to her to come downstairs -- Lizzie said that her father had been killed while she (Lizzie) went to the barn. He had been hacked in the face and head with an axe or hatchet. After a doctor was called, Abby was found, also dead, in a bedroom, also hacked many times (the later investigation said twenty times, not forty as in the children's rhyme) with an axe or hatchet.

Later tests showed that Abby had died 1-2 hours before Andrew; because Andrew died without a will, this meant that his estate, worth about $300,000 to $500,000, would go to his daughters, and not to Abby's heirs.

Lizzie Borden was arrested.

 

Trial of Lizzie Borden

Evidence included a report that she'd tried to burn a dress a week after the murder (a friend testified it had been stained with paint), and reports that she had tried to buy a poison just before the murders. The murder weapon was never found for certain -- a hatchet head that may have been washed and deliberately made to look dirty was found in the cellar -- nor any blood-stained clothes.

Lizzie Borden's trial began June 3, 1893. It was widely covered by the press locally and nationally. Some Massachusetts feminists wrote in Borden's favor. Townspeople split into two camps. Borden did not testify, having told the inquest that she had been searching the barn for fishing equipment and then eating pears outside during the time of the murders. She said "I am innocent. I leave it to my counsel to speak for me."

Without direct evidence of Lizzie Borden's part in the murder, the jury was not convinced of her guilt. Lizzie Borden was acquitted on June 20, 1893.


After the Trial

She remained in Fall River, buying a new and bigger home she called "Maplecroft," and calling herself Lizbeth instead of Lizzie. She lived with her sister Emma until they had a falling-out in 1904 or 1905, possibly over Emma's displeasure at Lizzie's friends from the New York theater crowd. Both Lizzie and Emma also took in many pets, and left part of their estates to the Animal Rescue League.

Lizzie Borden died at Fall River, Massachusetts, in 1927, her legend as a murderess still strong. She was buried next to her father and stepmother. The home in which the murders took place opened as a bed-and-breakfast in 1992.


 

 

 

 Thomas Cornell Jr.

(1627-1673)

8th Great Grandfather

Hanged for Murder on Spectral Evidence


Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)

Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.

Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)

Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.

Elijah Cornell Sr. (1730-1777)

Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.

Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)

Son of Elijah Cornell Sr.

John Cornell (1788-1860)

Son of Ezra Cornell

Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)

Son of John Cornell

Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)

Son of Harrison Cornell

George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)

Son of Lafayette Cornell

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of George Everett Cornell

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Mary Alice Cornell


 

 Thomas Cornell was one of the earliest settlers of Rhode Island and the Bronx and a contemporary of Roger Williams and the family of Anne Hutchinson. He is the ancestor of a number of Americans prominent in business, politics, and education.

Thomas Cornell born about 1595 in Essex, England and died in Portsmouth, RI in 1655. He married Rebecca Briggs, born in 1600, in about 1620. Their eldest son also named Thomas Cornell (Jr.) was born October, 1627 in Saffron Walden, Essex, England. Thomas Cornell and his family immigrated from England to Boston in 1638 when their eldest son Thomas Cornell (Jr.) would have been age 11.

Thomas Cornell was an innkeeper in Boston who was part of the Peripheral Group in the Antinomian Controversy, a religious and political conflict in the Massachusetts Bay Colony from 1636 to 1638.[1] Cornell sold his inn in 1643 and left for Rhode Island, where others from the Antinomian Controversy had settled in 1638 after being ordered to leave the Massachusetts Bay Colony.[2]

Cornell became friends with Roger Williams and co-founded the village of Westchester north of New Amsterdam (later New York City) in 1643. He returned to Rhode Island in 1644 and obtained a land grant for 100 acres in Portsmouth, RI on Aquidneck Island that became the Cornell homestead. His neighbor was Edward Hutchison, a son of Anne Hutchison from the Antinomian Controversy.[2]

In 1646, Cornell was granted a patent on an area of about four square miles that later became part of the Bronx. It was bounded by Westchester Creek, Bronx River, village of Westchester and East River and was called Cornell's Neck. The area is now known as Clason Point.[2]

Controversial Murder Trial of Thomas Cornell Jr.

Thomas' son Thomas Cornell (Jr.) was accused, tried, convicted and hanged for the alleged murder of his mother, Rebecca Briggs Cornell, in Portsmouth in 1673. He was convicted using circumstantial evidence as well as spectral evidence, where witnesses recounted dreams involving ghosts pointing to his alleged guilt. American jurisprudence was later modernized to exclude the use of apparitions and dreams as evidence in trials. This case and its history has been chronicled in the book Killed Strangely: The Death of Rebecca Cornell by Elaine Forman Crane.[3][4]

Compliments of Wikipedia

 

 

 Rufus King

(1755-1827)

Husband of 1st Cousin 1x Removed of Wife of 3rd Cousin 7X removed

United States Senator from New York (1813-1825) United States Minister to Great Britain (1825-1826)




Mary Frogat Alsop (1769-1819)

Wife of Rufus King

John Alsop Jr. (1724-1794)

Father of Mary Frogat Alsop

Abigail Sackett (1695-1751)

Mother of John Alsop Jr.

Joseph Sackett Sr. (1656-1719)

Father of Abigail Sackett

Joseph Sacket Jr. (1680-1755)

Son of Joseph Sackett Sr.

Frances Sackett (1720-1754)

Daughter of Joseph Sackett Jr.

Jacob Francis Blackwell Jr. (1717-1780)

Husband of Frances Sackett

Mary Hallett (1687-1743)

Mother of Jacob Francis Blackwell Jr.

Sarah Woosley (1650-1727)

Mother of Mary Hallett

Rebecca Cornell (1622-1713)

Mother of Sarah Woosley

Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)

Father of Rebecca Cornell

Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)

Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.

Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)

Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.

Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)

Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.

Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)

Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.

Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)

Son of Elijah Cornell

John Cornell (1788-1860)

Son of Ezra Cornell

Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)

Son of John Cornell

Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)

Son of Harrison Cornell

George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)

Son of Lafayette Cornell

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of George Everett Cornell

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Mary Alice Cornell


 Rufus King was an American lawyer and politician born in March 1755, in Scarborough, Maine. After the Revolutionary War ended, he graduated from Harvard College at the top of his class and studied law. He was admitted to the bar in 1780 and soon after represented Massachusetts in the Continental Congress and at the Constitutional Convention. King was one of the framers and signers of the U.S. Constitution and was a vocal lifelong opponent of slavery. In 1789, King became one of New York's first U.S. senators and later served as U.S. ambassador to Great Britain.

Early Politics and the Continental Congress

A founding father of the United States, Rufus King was born in 1755, in Scarborough, Maine. He entered Harvard College in 1773, but his studies were interrupted in 1775 by the onset of the Revolutionary War, as the buildings on Harvard's campus were allocated to house soldiers. In 1776, King's studies commenced, and he graduated the following year, soon beginning a career in law in Newburyport, Massachusetts.

King was admitted to the bar in 1780 and was elected to the Massachusetts state legislature, which sent him to Philadelphia in 1784 to represent Massachusetts in the Continental Congress (until 1787, when he became one of the signers of the new Constitution). In the Continental Congress, King introduced the resolution suggesting a convention be held to draft a new Constitution and added resolutions to the Northwest Ordinance that banned slavery in the Northwest Territory.

Always a staunch anti-slavery activist, King later (as a U.S. senator, in 1817) voted to end the domestic slave trade and demanded that an anti-slavery clause be added to Missouri's application for statehood (1820) or the petition should be denied.

U.S. Senator From New York

In 1788 King moved to New York, where he was elected to the state assembly the following year. During King's first summer in New York, he and General Philip Schuyler—who served in the Revolutionary War as well as the Continental Congress—were elected New York's first U.S. senators (1789). King became known as a Federalist leader in Congress and remained a prominent and loyal member of the party his entire career. President George Washington approached King about becoming secretary of state, but King declined and instead accepted a later appointment as U.S. ambassador to Great Britain (1796–1803; 1825–1826).

To take the post, King had to resign from the Senate, only a year after winning his reelection bid. He returned to the Senate in 1813, however, and served two more terms. Over the course of his Senate career, King helped form the first Bank of the United States and chaired the Committee on Roads and Canals and the Committee on Foreign Relations.

 

 

 John Aslop King

(1788-1867)

1st Cousin 2x Removed of Wife of 3rd Cousin 7x Removed

Governor of New York (1857-1858) United States Senator (1823-1825)




Mary Frogat Alsop (1769-1819)

Mother of John Aslop King

John Alsop Jr. (1724-1794)

Father of Mary Frogat Alsop

Abigail Sackett (1695-1751)

Mother of John Alsop Jr.

Joseph Sackett Sr. (1656-1719)

Father of Abigail Sackett

Joseph Sacket Jr. (1680-1755)

Son of Joseph Sackett Sr.

Frances Sackett (1720-1754)

Daughter of Joseph Sackett Jr.

Jacob Francis Blackwell Jr. (1717-1780)

Husband of Frances Sackett

Mary Hallett (1687-1743)

Mother of Jacob Francis Blackwell Jr.

Sarah Woosley (1650-1727)

Mother of Mary Hallett

Rebecca Cornell (1622-1713)

Mother of Sarah Woosley

Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)

Father of Rebecca Cornell

Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)

Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.

Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)

Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.

Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)

Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.

Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)

Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.

Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)

Son of Elijah Cornell

John Cornell (1788-1860)

Son of Ezra Cornell

Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)

Son of John Cornell

Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)

Son of Harrison Cornell

George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)

Son of Lafayette Cornell

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of George Everett Cornell

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Mary Alice Cornell


 KING, John Alsop, (son of Rufus King and brother of James Gore King), a Representative from New York; born in New York City January 3, 1788; attended Harrow School, England, and also studied in Paris; returned to New York City; studied law; was admitted to the bar; served in the War of 1812 as lieutenant of Cavalry; engaged in farming near Jamaica, N.Y.; member of the State assembly 1819-1821; served in the State senate from 1823 until his resignation in 1825; appointed secretary of the legation at London in 1825; Chargé d’Affaires June 15 to August 5, 1826; again elected to the State assembly in 1832, 1838, and 1840; delegate to the Whig National Convention in 1839 and 1852; elected as a Whig to the Thirty-first Congress (March 4, 1849-March 3, 1851); resumed the practice of law; Governor of New York in 1857 and 1858; delegate to the Republican National Convention in 1856; member of the peace convention of 1861 held in Washington, D.C., in an effort to devise means to prevent the impending war; died in Jamaica, Long Island, N.Y., July 7, 1867; interment in Grace Church Cemetery.

 

 

 Thomas C. Cornell

(1814-1860)

6th Cousin 4x Removed

United States House of Representatives from New York (1867-1869) & (1881-1883)




Peter Cornell (1780-1860)

Father of Thomas C. Cornell

Thomas Cornell (1754-1817)

Father of Peter Cornell

Peter Cornell (1732-1767)

Father of Thomas Cornell

Richard Cornell Jr. (1708-1758)

Father of Peter Cornell

Richard Cornell Sr. (1678-1757)

Father of Richard Cornell Jr.

John Cornell (1634-1694)

Father of Richard Cornell Sr.

Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)

Father of John Cornell

Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)

Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.

Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)

Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.

Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)

Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.

Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)

Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.

Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)

Son of Elijah Cornell

John Cornell (1788-1860)

Son of Ezra Cornell

Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)

Son of John Cornell

Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)

Son of Harrison Cornell

George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)

Son of Lafayette Cornell

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of George Everett Cornell

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Mary Alice Cornell


He was born in White Plains, New York on January 27, 1814 to Peter Cornell (1780–1860) and Margaret Gedney (1786–1829). After attending public schools, Thomas C. Cornell was drawn to Rondout, N.Y. by his uncle, Thomas W. Cornell, Peter's brother. Thomas W. came to the Rondout area in 1822 and opened a general store in New Salem. When the Delaware and Hudson canal opened in 1828 his business grew rapidly.

In the 1830s Thomas C. Cornell worked for David P. Mapes of Coxsackie, NY. Mapes' enterprises foreshadowed Cornell's business success. Mapes owned the sidewheelerGeneral Jackson which had the contract to haul barges for the D&H Canal Company and he also owned a stage line running from Rondout into the Catskills.

In 1837 with his own sloop, Cornell started what was to become the Cornell Seamboat Company. In 1850 he obtained the contract for towing D&H Canal Company barges. Following the Civil War the Cornell Steamboat Line virtually monopolized freight traffic on the Hudson River, dominating the towing of barges well into the 1900s. While the Steamboat Company was the heart of his empire, Cornell engaged in many other related enterprises.

In 1866 he incorporated what was to become the Ulster and Delaware Railroad (U&D). He was involved in the construction and operation of several other railroads including the Wallkill Valley and the Rhinebeck and Connecticut Railroad.

In 1868, along with other business leaders in Rondout, he founded the Rondout Savings Bank. He is also reported to have been a founder of a commercial bank.

Cornell at one time owned the Grand Hotel, a luxurious hotel set on the border between Ulster and Delaware counties. The Grand Hotel had its own station, Grand Hotel Station (today known as Highmount) on theUlster and Delaware Railroad.

He died in Kingston, New York on March 30, 1890 and was interred at the Montrepose Cemetery. 

Courtesy of Wikipedia 

 

 

John Alsop Jr.


(1724-1794)

1st Cousin of Wife of 3rd Cousin 7x Removed

Delegate for the New York Continental Congress During the Revolutionary War




Abigail Sackett (1695-1751)

Mother of John Alsop Jr.

Joseph Sackett Sr. (1656-1719)

Father of Abigail Sackett

Joseph Sacket Jr. (1680-1755)

Son of Joseph Sackett Sr.

Frances Sackett (1720-1754)

Daughter of Joseph Sackett Jr.

Jacob Francis Blackwell Jr. (1717-1780)

Husband of Frances Sackett

Mary Hallett (1687-1743)

Mother of Jacob Francis Blackwell Jr.

Sarah Woosley (1650-1727)

Mother of Mary Hallett

Rebecca Cornell (1622-1713)

Mother of Sarah Woosley

Thomas Cornell Sr. (1594-1655)

Father of Rebecca Cornell

Thomas Cornell Jr. (1627-1673)

Son of Thomas Cornell Sr.

Stephan Cornell Sr. (1656-1714)

Son of Thomas Cornell Jr.

Stephan Cornell Jr. (1696-1767)

Son of Stephan Cornell Sr.

Elijah Cornell Sr (1730-1777)

Son of Stephan Cornell Jr.

Ezra Cornell (1770-1833)

Son of Elijah Cornell

John Cornell (1788-1860)

Son of Ezra Cornell

Harrison Cornell (1824-1872)

Son of John Cornell

Lafayette Cornell (1859-1937)

Son of Harrison Cornell

George Everett Cornell (1896-1943)

Son of Lafayette Cornell

Mary Alice Cornell (1931-2010)

Daughter of George Everett Cornell

Eric E. Glosser

Son of Mary Alice Cornell


 ALSOP, John, a Delegate from New York; born in New Windsor, Orange County, N.Y., in 1724; completed preparatory studies; moved to New York City and engaged in mercantile pursuits and importing; represented New York City in the colonial legislature; one of the incorporators of the New York Hospital, serving as its governor 1770-1784; Member of the Continental Congress 1774-1776; member of a committee of one hundred appointed in 1775 by the citizens of the city to take charge of the government until a convention could be assembled; served as the eighth president of the New York Chamber of Commerce in 1784 and 1785; died in Newtown, Long Island, N.Y., November 22, 1794; interment in Trinity Church Cemetery, New York City.

 

 24th Great Uncle

father of Richard Cornwall King of Romans

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

 

 Richard of Cornwall (5 January 1209 – 2 April 1272), second son of King John, was Count of Poitou (1225-1243), 1st Earl of Cornwall (from 1225) and German King (formally "King of the Romans") (from 1257). He was one of the wealthiest men in Europe and joined the Barons' Crusade, where he achieved success as a negotiator for the release of prisoners and assisted with the building of the citadel in Ascalon.

He was born 5 January 1209 at Winchester Castle, the second son of King John and Isabella of Angoulême. He was made High Sheriff of Berkshire at the age of only eight, was styled Count of Poitou from 1225 and in the same year, at the age of sixteen, his brother King Henry III gave him Cornwall as a birthday present, making himHigh Sheriff of Cornwall. Richard's revenues from Cornwall provided him with great wealth, and he became one of the wealthiest men in Europe. Though he campaigned on King Henry's behalf in Poitou and Brittany, and served as regent three times, relations were often strained between the brothers in the early years of Henry's reign. Richard rebelled against him three times, and had to be bought off with lavish gifts.

Marriage to Isabel, 1231–40[edit]

In March 1231 he married Isabel Marshal, the wealthy widow of the Earl of Gloucester, much to the displeasure of his brother King Henry, who feared the Marshal family because they were rich, influential, and often opposed to him. Richard became stepfather to Isabel's six children from her first husband. In that same year he acquired his main residence, Wallingford Castle in Berkshire (now Oxfordshire), and spent much money on developing it. He had other favoured properties at Marlow and Cippenhamin Buckinghamshire. Isabel and Richard had four children, of whom only their son, Henry of Almain, survived to adulthood. Richard opposed Simon de Montfort, and rose in rebellion in 1238 to protest against the marriage of his sister, Eleanor, to Simon. Once again he was placated with rich gifts. When Isabel was on her deathbed in 1240, she asked to be buried next to her first husband at Tewkesbury, but Richard had her interred at Beaulieu Abbey instead. As a pious gesture, however, he sent her heart to Tewkesbury.

On Crusade and marriage to Sanchia, 1240–43[edit]

Later that year Richard departed for the Holy Land. He fought no battles but managed to negotiate for the release of prisoners and the burials of Crusaders killed at a battle in Gaza in 1239. He also refortified Ascalon, which had been demolished by Saladin. On his return from the Holy Land, Richard visited his sister Isabella, the empress of Frederick II.

After the birth of prince Edward in 1239, provisions were made in case of the king's death, which favoured the Queen and her Savoyard relatives and excluded Richard. To keep him from becoming discontented King Henry and Queen Eleanor brought up the idea of a marriage with Eleanor's sister Sanchia shortly after his return on 28 January 1242.[citation needed] On his journey to the Holy Land, Richard had met her in Provence, where he was warmly welcomed by her father Raymond Berenger IV and had fallen in love with this beautiful girl.[2] Richard and Sanchia (whom the English called Cynthia) married at Westminster in November 1243.

This marriage tied him closely to the royal party. Eleanor and Sanchia's youngest sister Beatrice would marry Charles I of Naples, while their oldest sister Margaret had married Louis IX of France. The marriages of the kings of France and England, and their two brothers to the four sisters fromProvence improved the relationship between the two countries, which led up to the Treaty of Paris.[3]

Poitou and Sicily[edit]

Richard's claims to Gascony and Poitou were never more than nominal, and in 1241 King Louis IX of France invested his own brother Alphonse with Poitou. Moreover, Richard and Henry's mother, Isabella of Angoulême, claimed to have been insulted by the French queen. They were encouraged to recover Poitou by their stepfather, Hugh X of Lusignan, but the expedition turned into a military fiasco after Lusignan betrayed them.[4]

The pope offered Richard the crown of Sicily, but according to Matthew Paris he responded to the extortionate price by saying, "You might as well say, 'I make you a present of the moon – step up to the sky and take it down'."[5] Instead, his brother King Henry purchased the kingdom for his own son Edmund.

Although Richard was elected in 1256 as King of Germany by four of the seven German Electoral Princes (CologneMainz, the Palatinate and Bohemia), his candidacy was opposed by Alfonso X of Castile who was elected by Saxony, Brandenburg and Trier. The pope and king Louis IX of France favoured Alfonso, but both were ultimately convinced by the powerful relatives of Richard's sister-in-law, Eleanor of Provence, to support Richard. Ottokar II of Bohemia, who at first voted for Richard but later elected Alfonso, eventually agreed to support the earl of Cornwall, thus establishing the required simple majority. So Richard had to bribe only four of them, but this came at a huge cost of 28,000 marks. On 27 May 1257 the archbishop of Cologne himself crowned Richard "King of the Romans" in Aachen;[6] however, like his lordships in Gascony and Poitou, his title never held much significance, and he made only four brief visits to Germany between 1257 and 1269.

Richard of Cornwall married thrice:

Firstly, on 30 March 1231 at Fawley, Buckinghamshire, to Isabel Marshal, daughter of William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke (by his wife Isabel FitzGilbert) and widow ofGilbert de Clare, 5th Earl of Gloucester. Isabel died in child-birth at Berkhamsted Castle on 17 January 1240, and was buried at Beaulieu Abbey. By Isabel he had three sons and a daughter:[7]

John of Cornwall (31 January 1232 – 22 September 1232), born and died at Marlow, Buckinghamshire, buried at Reading Abbey.

Isabel of Cornwall (c. 9 September 1233 – 6 October 1234), born and died at Marlow, Buckinghamshire, buried at Reading Abbey.

Henry of Cornwall (2 November 1235 – 13 March 1271) Henry of Almain, murdered by his cousins Guy and Simon de Montfort, buried at Hailes Abbey.

Nicholas of Cornwall (b. & d. 17 January 1240 at Berkhamsted Castle), died shortly after birth, buried at Beaulieu Abbey with his mother.

Secondly he married, on 23 November 1243 at Westminster AbbeySanchia of Provence (c.1225 – 9 November 1261), daughter of Raymond, Count of Provence by his wifeBeatrice of Savoy, by whom he had two sons:[8]

unnamed son, (born July 1246, died 15 August 1246).

Edmund, 2nd Earl of Cornwall (c. 1 January 1250 – c. 25 September 1300), usually styled Edmund of Almain, who married Margaret de Clare (born 1250, died shortly before November 1312), daughter of Richard de Clare, Earl of Gloucester, by his second wife, Maud de Lacy, daughter of John de Lacy, 2nd Earl of Lincoln. They had no issue, and the marriage was dissolved in February 1294.

Thirdly he married, on 16 June 1269 at KaiserslauternBeatrice of Falkenburg, daughter of Dietrich I, Count of Falkenburg. They had no issue.[9] She was about sixteen years of age at the time of the marriage, and was said to be one of the most beautiful women of her time.[citation needed] Beatrice died 17 October 1277, and was buried before the high altar at the Church of the Grey Friars in Oxford.[10]

Mistress & illegitimate progeny[edit]

Joan de Valletort[edit]

Richard, Earl of Cornwall had a mistress, Joan, of unknown origins,[11] wife successively of Ralph de Valletort (d. 1267),[12] feudal baron of Harberton,[13] Devon, and feudal baron of Trematon, Cornwall, and Sir Alexander Okeston of Modbury, Devon.[14] Richard, Earl of Cornwall, had the following progeny by his mistress Joan de Valletort, three sons and two daughters:[15]

Philip of Cornwall, a priest.

Sir Richard of Cornwall, who received a grant from his half-brother Edmund, 2nd Earl of Cornwall, (d. 1300) in which he was called "brother". He married Joan FitzAlan, daughter of John FitzAlan, 6th Earl of Arundel, and by her had three sons and a daughter. He was slain by an arrow at the Siege of Berwick in 1296. His daughter, Joan of Cornwall, married Sir John Howard, from whom the Howard familyDukes of Norfolk, are descended.[16]

Heraldic escutcheon from mural monument in Branscombe Church, Devon, to Joan Tregarthin (died 1583), wife of John Wadham (died 1578). Her descent from Richard, Earl of Cornwall is referred to in the inscription and the arms of his descendants, the de Cornwall family of Brannel, are shown in the 4th quarter of the sinister half of the escutcheon: lion rampant in chief a label of three points a bordure engrailed bezantée. The appearance of bezantée charges is a reference to the arms of the Duchy of Cornwall (Sable, fifteen bezants 5,4,3,2,1)

Sir Walter of Cornwall, who received a grant of the royal manor of Brannel,[17] Cornwall, from his half-brother Edmund, 2nd Earl of Cornwall (d. 1300) in which he was called "brother". He was the father of William de Cornwall and grandfather of John de Cornwall who married Margery Tregago, parents of Margaret de Cornwall who married David Hendower, from whom was descended Joan Tregarthin (d. 1583), wife of John Wadham (d.1578) of Edge, Branscombe.[18] The mural monument of Joan Tregarthin (d. 1583) in Branscombe Church, Devon, has an inscription referring to her as "a virtuous & antient gentlewoman descended of the antient house of Plantagenets sometime of Cornwall" and shows the arms of Tregarthin quartering the arms of the de Cornwall family of BrannelA lion rampant in chief a label of three points a bordure engrailed bezantée.

Isabel of Cornwall, who received a grant from King Henry III in which she was called "niece".

Joan of Cornwall, (alias Joan Okeston, legally the daughter and heiress of Sir Alexander Okeston of Modbury, Devon)[19] who in 1283 received a grant from her half-brotherEdmund, 2nd Earl of Cornwall (d.1300) in which she was called "sister".[20] Modbury was part of the Valletorts' feudal barony of Harberton and was granted to Sir Alexander Okeston, following his marriage to the Earl of Cornwall's mistress, Joan, widow of Ralph de Valletort, by Roger de Valletort, Ralph's brother.[21] She married twice, firstly to Richard de Champernowne (2nd son of Sir Henry Champernowne of Clyst Champernowne, Devon), by whom she had a son, Sir Richard de Champernowne, and secondly, Sir Peter de Fishacre, of Combe Fishacre and Coleton Fishacre, Devon,[22] by whom she had no issue. Following the death of her childless brother Sir James Okeston, the manor of Modbury was conveyed by order of Edward II (1307–27, great-nephew of Richard, Earl of Cornwall), to his sister's grandson Sir Richard de Champernowne.

 King John (King of England)

 John Lackland

Father of Richard Plantagenet

My: 24th Great Grandfather

Cornell Side

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

King John of England
The following biography information provides basic facts and information about the life of King John King of England:

Nationality: English

Also Known by the Nickname: Lackland. John, King Henry II youngest son, had been called Lackland, because he had nothing when his brothers each had some great dukedom

Lifespan: 1167 - 1216

Reigned as King of England: April 6, 1199 – October 19,1216. His Coronation was on May 27, 1199 

Date of Birth: King John was born on December 24, 1167 at Beaumont Palace, Oxford

Family connections / Genealogy: He was the son of King Henry II (1133–1189) and Eleanor of Aquitaine (1124–1204). He succeeded his brother, Richard the Lionheart to the throne of England

Date succeeded to the throne of England: April 6, 1199 . His Coronation was on May 27, 1199

Married: John was married to Avisa, daughter and heiress of William Fitz Robert, 2nd Earl of Gloucester in 1189 but the marriage was annulled. He then married Isabelle of Angouleme on August 24, 1200

The children of King John:

Henry III

Richard, Earl of Cornwall

Joan of England

Isabella of England

Eleanor of England

Date when King John died: October 19, 1216 at Newark. King John was buried Worcester Cathedral

Cause of the Death of King John: He died after eating peaches

Character of King John: Unscrupulous, cruel, disloyal. A notorious womaniser

Accomplishments or why King John was famous: His treacherous behaviour to his brother King Richard the Lionheart. The Barons rebellion. The Legend of Robin Hood. The murder of  his nephew Arthur. Losing Normandy and signing of theMagna Carta

King John
The story and biography of King John which contains interesting information, facts & the history about the life of King John

Timeline of King John

The story of King John ( Nickname : John Lackland) 
Richard the Lionheart had never had any children, but his brother Geoffrey, who was older than John, had left a son named Arthur, who was about twelve years old, and who was rightly the Duke of Normandy and Count of Anjou. King Philip, who was always glad to vex whoever was king of England, took Arthur under his protection, and promised to get Normandy out of John's hands. However, John had a meeting with him and persuaded him to desert Arthur, and marry his son Louis to John's own niece, Blanche, who had a chance of being queen of part of Spain.

King John and his nephew Arthur 
Arthur lived at the French King's court, and when he was sixteen years old, Philip helped him to raise an army and go to try his fortune against his uncle. He laid siege to Mirabeau, a town where his grandmother, Queen Eleanor, was living. John, who was then in Normandy, hurried to her rescue, beat Arthur's army, made him prisoner and carried him off, first to Rouen, and then to the strong castle of Falaise. Nobody quite knows what was done to him there. The governor, Hubert de Burgh, once found him fighting hard, though with no weapon but a stool, to defend himself from some ruffians who had been sent to put out his eyes. Hubert saved him from these men, but shortly after this good man was sent elsewhere by the king, and John came himself to Falaise. Arthur was never seen alive again, and it is believed that John took him out in a boat in the river at night, stabbed him with his own hand, and threw his body into the river. It is believed that John was guilty of his nephew's death, and he was fully known to be one of the most selfish and cruel men who ever lived; and so lazy, that he let Philip take Normandy from him, without stirring a finger to save the grand old dukedom of his forefathers.

King John and Pope Innocent 
Matters became much worse in England, when he quarrelled with the Pope Innocent, about who should be archbishop of Canterbury. The Pope wanted a man named Stephen Langton to be archbishop, but the king swore he should never come into the kingdom. Then the Pope punished the kingdom, by forbidding all church services in all parish churches. The was termed putting the kingdom under an interdict. John was not much distressed by this, though his people were; but when he found that Innocent was stirring up the King of France to come to attack him, he thought it time to make his peace with the Pope. So he not only consented to receive Stephen Langton, but he even knelt down before the Pope's legate, or messenger, and took off his crown, giving it up to the legate, in token that he only held the kingdom from the Pope. It was two or three days before it was given back to him; and the Pope held himself to be lord of England, and made the king and people pay him money whenever he demanded it.

King John and the Magna Carta 
All this time John's cruelty and savageness were making the whole kingdom miserable; and at last the great barons could bear it no longer. They met together and agreed that they would make John swear to govern by the good old English laws that had prevailed before the Normans came. The difficulty was to be sure of what these laws were, for most of the copies of them had been lost. However, Archbishop Langton and some of the wisest of the barons put together a set of laws--some copied, some recollected, some old, some new--but all such as to give the barons some control of the king, and hinder him from getting savage soldiers together to frighten people into doing whatever he chose to make them. These laws they called Magna Carta, or the great charter; and they all came in armor, and took John by surprise at Windsor. He came to meet them in a meadow named Runnymede, on the bank of the Thames, and there they forced him to sign the charter, for which all Englishmen are grateful to them. But he did not mean to keep it and prepared to take vengeance on the barons.

Louis, the son of Philip of France made King of England and the Death of King John
They found themselves not strong enough to make head against him; so they invited Louis, the son of Philip of France and husband of John's niece, to come and be their king. He came, and was received in London, while John and his bands of soldiers were roaming about the eastern counties, wasting and burning everywhere till they came to the Wash, the bay between Lincolnshire and Norfolk, where so many rivers run into the sea. There is a safe way across the sands in this bay when the tide is low, but when it is coming in and meets the rivers, the waters rise suddenly into a flood. So it happened to King John; he did get out himself, but all carts with his goods and treasures were lost, and many of his men. He was full of rage and grief, but he went on to the abbey where he meant to sleep. He supped on peaches and new ale, and soon after became very ill. He died in a few days, a miserable, disgraced man, with half his people fighting against him and London in the hands of his worst enemy, Louis the son of the King of France.
 

 

  King Henry II (King of England)

 Henry Plantagenet II

Father of King John

My: 25th Great Grandfather

Cornell Side

son of Henry Plantagenet King of England II

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

King Henry II of England
The following biography, short history and interesting facts provide helpful information for history courses and history coursework about the life of King Henry II King of England:

Country of Origin / Nationality: French / English

Also Known by the Nicknames: "Curt Mantle" (because he wore practical short cloaks), "Fitz Empress" ( meaning the son of an Empress: Matilda) and also "The Lion of Justice" which was a nickname first given to his grandfather Henry I

The word Angevin derives from Anjou (the father of King Henry II was Geoffrey of Anjou)

The word Plantagenet derives from the French plant 'genet' and a spray of this broom blossom was worn by King Henry II in his cap. This nickname became "Plantagenet;" which became a kind of surname to the kings of England.

Lifetime: 1133 – 1189

Period he reigned as King of England: 1154–1189

Born: King Henry II was born on 5 March 1133 at Le Mans

Close family connections or relatives: Grandson of King Henry I. He was the son of Queen Matilda and Geoffrey of Anjou

King Henry II and Eleanor of Aquitaine had the following children:

Henry the Young King (1155–1183)

Richard I (1157–1199)

Geoffrey, Duke of Brittany (1158–1186)

Matilda, Duchess of Saxony (1156–1189)

Leonora of England (1161–1214)

Joan Plantagenet (1165–1199)

John (1167–1216)

King Henry II had two illegitimate children:

Geoffrey, Archbishop of York (1152–1226)

William de Longespee, 3rd Earl of Salisbury (1176- 1226)

Henry II Married: Eleanor of Aquitaine on 18 May 1152

Date succeeded to the throne of England: 1154. His coronation was on 19 December 1154

Date when King Henry II died: 6 July 1189 at the Chateau Chinon. King Henry II was buried Fontevraud Abbey 

Character of King Henry II: Clever, strong, determined and spirited. He had a terrible temper

Accomplishments and Achievements or why King Henry II was famous: He was the first of the Plantagenet or Angevin Kings. He made Ireland a part of his vast domain. He struggled withThomas Beckett who ended up being murdered in Canterbury Cathedral

King Henry II
The story and biography of King Henry II which contains interesting information, facts & the history about the life of King Henry II

Timeline of King Henry II

The story of King Henry I ( Nicknames : "Curt Mantle", "Fitz Empress" and "The Lion of Justice")
Henry Fitz-Empress was the first king of the Plantagenet family, also called the House of Anjou. He followed King Stephen as King of England. A strong king who pulled down almost all the Castles that had been built in Stephen's time to gain control and power over the barons. Henry was an extremely powerful king who was lord of nearly half France.

The story of King Henry I and Thomas a Becket
 King Henry II ruled England well and made many laws. One was that, if a priest or monk was thought to have committed any crime, he should be tried by a king's judge, instead of a bishop. The Archbishop of Canterbury, Thomas a Becket, refused to consent to this law. Thomas a Becket and King Henry II had once been great friends but this refusal led to their argument. King Henry was so angry with him that Thomas a Becket was forced to leave England, and take shelter with the King of France. Six years passed by before a temporary reconciliation was made. The archbishop realised that the king still hated him. Just after his return, Thomas a Becket laid under censure some persons who had given offence. They went and complained to the king, and Henry exclaimed in passion, "Will no one rid me of this turbulent priest?" Four of his knights who heard these words set forth to Canterbury. The archbishop guessed why they were come; but he would not flee again, and waited for them by the altar in the cathedral, not even letting the doors be shut. There they slew him. King Henry was devastated by this act which had been prompted by his own words.  After three years King Henry showed his penitence by entering Canterbury Cathedral barefoot and knelt before the tomb of Thomas a Becket. The penitence continued with every priest or monk in turn to strike him with a rod.

The story of King Henry I and Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine
Whilst the dispute with Thomas a Becket was going on, the Earl of Pembroke, called Strongbow, one of Henry's nobles, had gone over to Ireland and obtained a little kingdom there, which he professed to hold for King Henry. The Kings of England became became Lords of Ireland, though for a long time they only had the Province of Leinster, and were always at war with the Irish around. Henry was a most powerful king; but his latter years were very unhappy. His wife was a difficult woman, and her sons were all disobedient and rebellious. Once all the three eldest sons, Henry, Richard, and Geoffrey, and their mother, left the court, and began to make war upon him. King Henry was much stronger and soon forced them to submit. Queen Eleanor was incarcerated in a strong castle in England as long as he lived. Her sons were much more fond of her than of their father, and they thought this usage so hard, that they were all the more ready to break out against him.

King Henry I and his son, Henry the Young King
In 1170, his eldest son Henry ( known as Henry the Young King) was crowned king of England as Henry III. Historians know him as Henry "the Young King" so as not to confuse him with the later king of this name who was his nephew. The battle between father and son raged on when Henry, who was leading an army against his father, when he was taken ill, and felt himself dying. He sent an entreaty that his father would forgive him, and come to see him. But the young man had so often been false and treacherous, that Henry feared it was only a trick to get him as a prisoner, and only sent his ring and a message of pardon; and young Henry died, pressing the ring to his lips, and longing to hear his father's voice.

King Henry I and his other sons, Geoffrey, Richard and John
Geoffrey, his third son, was killed by a fall from his horse, and there were only two sons left alive, Richard and John. News came that the Mohammedans in the Holy Land had won Jerusalem back again; and the Pope called on all Christian princes to go on a crusade to recover the Jerusalem and the Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The kings of England and France, young Richard, and many more, were roused to take the cross; but while arrangements for going were being made, a fresh dispute about them arose, and Richard went away in a rage, got his friends together, and, with King Philip of France to help him, began to make war on King Henry. His father was feeble, and worn out, and could not resist as in former times. He fell ill, and gave up the struggle, saying he would grant all they asked. The list of Richard's friends whom he was to pardon was brought to him, and the first name he saw in it was that of John, his youngest son, and his favourite, the one who had never before rebelled. His heart was broken and in the year 1189, Henry II died.

Famous Medieval Kings - King Henry II
Interesting facts and information with a short biography about the Medieval Life, Times and history of King Henry II. Additional useful details, facts, history, biography, timeline and information about the lives of all of the Medieval Kings of England and the important events which occurred during their times, can be accessed via the Medieval Life and Times Sitemap. The content of this article on Medieval life and times provides free educational details, facts and information for reference and research for schools, colleges and homework for history courses and history coursework.



 Geoffrey V Plantagenent

Count of Anjou

Father of King Henry II

My: 26th Great Grandfather

Cornell Side

son of Geoffrey Plantagenent Count of Anjou V

son of Henry Plantagenet King of England II

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

Geoffrey V (24 August 1113 – 7 September 1151), called the Handsome (Frenchle Bel) and Plantagenet, was the Count of AnjouTouraine, and Maine by inheritance from 1129 and then Duke of Normandy by conquest from 1144. By his marriage to the Empress Matilda, daughter and heiress of Henry I of England, Geoffrey had a son,Henry Curtmantle, who succeeded to the English throne and founded the Plantagenet dynasty to which Geoffrey gave his nickname. 

Matilda Adelaide Beauclerc 

Queen of England, Holy Roman Empress

Wife of Geoffrey V / Mother of King Henry II

My: 26th Great Grandmother

Cornell Side

son of Geoffrey Plantagenent Count of Anjou V

son of Henry Plantagenet King of England II

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

 Fulk (King of Jerusalem)

Father of Geoffrey V

My: 27th Great Grandfather

Cornell Side

son of Fulke Comte Anjou King of Jerusalem V

son of Geoffrey Plantagenent Count of Anjou V

son of Henry Plantagenet King of England II

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Henry III (King of England)

Henry Plantagenet III

My: 23rd Great Uncle

Cornell Side

mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Edward I (King of England)

Edward Longshanks Plantagenent

My: 1st Cousin 24x Removed

Cornell Side

father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I

mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Edward II (King of England)

Edward Plantagenent II

My: 2nd Cousin 23x Removed

Cornell Side

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II

father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I

mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Edward III (King of England)

Edward Plantagenent III

My: 3rd Cousin 23x Removed

Cornell Side

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II

father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I

mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Richard II (King of England)

Richard Plantagenent II

My: 5th Cousin 20x Removed

Cornell Side

father of Richard Plantagenet King of England II

father of Edward the Black Plantagenet

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II

father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I

mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Henry IV (King of England)

Henry Plantagenent IV

My: 5th Cousin 20x Removed

Cornell Side

father of Henry Plantagenet King of England IV

father of Edward the Black Plantagenet

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II

father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I

mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

  King Henry V (King of England) 

Henry Plantagenent V

My: 6th Cousin 19x Removed

Cornell Side

father of Henry Plantagenet King of England V

father of Henry Plantagenet King of England IV

father of Edward the Black Plantagenet

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II

father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I

mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

   King Henry VI (King of England)

Henry Plantagenent VI

My: 7th Cousin 18x Removed

Cornell Side

father of Henry VI Plantagenet England King of England

father of Henry Plantagenet King of England V

father of Henry Plantagenet King of England IV

father of Edward the Black Plantagenet

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II

father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I

mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Edward IV (King of England)

Edward Plantagenet IV

My: 7th Cousin 18x Removed

Cornell Side

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England IV

father of Richard Plantagenet 3rd Duke of York

father of Richard Conisburgh 3rd Earl of Cambridge

father of Edward the Black Plantagenet

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II

father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I

mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

  King Edward V (King of England)

Edward Plantagenet V

My: 8th Cousin 17x Removed

Cornell Side

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England V

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England IV

father of Richard Plantagenet 3rd Duke of York

father of Richard Conisburgh 3rd Earl of Cambridge

father of Edward the Black Plantagenet

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II

father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I

mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Richard III (King of England)

Richard Plantagenent III

My: 7th Cousin 18x Removed

Cornell Side

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England IV

father of Richard Plantagenet 3rd Duke of York

father of Richard Conisburgh 3rd Earl of Cambridge

father of Edward the Black Plantagenet

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II

father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I

mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Henry VII (King of England)

Henry Tudor VII

My: 8th Cousin 17X Removed

Cornell Side

father of Henry Tudor King of England VII

father of Owen Tudor

father of Henry Plantagenet King of England V

father of Henry Plantagenet King of England IV

father of Edward the Black Plantagenet

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II

father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I

mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Henry VIII (King of England)

Henry Tudor VIII

My: 9th Cousin 16x Removed

Cornell Side

father of Henry Tudor King of England VIII

father of Henry Tudor King of England VII

father of Owen Tudor

father of Henry Plantagenet King of England V

father of Henry Plantagenet King of England IV

father of Edward the Black Plantagenet

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II

father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I

mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

 King Edward VI (King of England)

Edward Tudor VI

My: 10th Cousin 15x Remvoed

Cornell Side

father of Edward Tudor King of England VI

father of Henry Tudor King of England VIII

father of Henry Tudor King of England VII

father of Owen Tudor

father of Henry Plantagenet King of England V

father of Henry Plantagenet King of England IV

father of Edward the Black Plantagenet

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II

father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I

mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

 Queen Mary I  (Queen of England)

Mary Tudor daughter of King Henry VIII

My: 10th Cousin 15x Removed

Cornell Side

father of Edward Tudor King of England VI

father of Henry Tudor King of England VIII

father of Henry Tudor King of England VII

father of Owen Tudor

father of Henry Plantagenet King of England V

father of Henry Plantagenet King of England IV

father of Edward the Black Plantagenet

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II

father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I

mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

  Queen Elizabeth I  (Queen of England)

Elizabeth Tudor daughter of King Henry VIII

My: 10th Cousin 15x Removed

Cornell Side

father of Edward Tudor King of England VI

father of Henry Tudor King of England VIII

father of Henry Tudor King of England VII

father of Owen Tudor

father of Henry Plantagenet King of England V

father of Henry Plantagenet King of England IV

father of Edward the Black Plantagenet

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England III

father of Edward Plantagenet King of England II

father of Edward Longshanks Plantagenet King of England I

mother of Henry Plantagenet King of England III

son of John Lackland King of England

son of Richard Plantagenet King of the Romans

son of Sir Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall Lord of Tunnock Earl of Cornwall

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Baron of Burford

son of Sir Richard DeCornwall Earl of Plantagenet II

son of Sir Geoffrey DeCornwall 1st Feudal Baron of Burford

son of Richard Plantagenet DeCornwall 5th Lord of Burford

son of Edmund Planetgenet DeCornwall Sir

son of Otis Cornwall Mayor of Hereford

son of Thomas Cornwall

son of Lawrence Cornwall

son of Robert Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of George Cornwall

son of Richard Cornwall

son of Thomas Cornell Sr

son of Thomas Cornell Jr

son of Stephan Cornell Sr

son of Stephan Cornell Jr

son of Elijah Cornell Sr

son of Ezra Cornell

son of John Cornell

son of Harrison Cornell

son of Lafayette Cornell

daughter of George Everett Cornell

son of Mary Alice Cornell

 Prince William Duke of Cambridge

 Prince Harry

My 20th Cousins 4x Removed

 Elizabeth Alexandra Windsor II 

Queen of England

(1926-)

My 18th Cousin 6x Removed

Charles Prince of Wales 

(1948-)

My 19th Cousin 5x Removed

 Prince William, Duke of Cambridge (1982-) & Henry Prince of Wales (1984 - )

20th cousin 4x removed

Charles Philip Arthur George Prince of Wales (1948 - )

father of Henry Prince of Wales

Elizabeth Alexandra Windsor II Queen of England (1926 - )

mother of Charles Philip Arthur George Prince of Wales

Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon Lady (1900 - 2002)

mother of Elizabeth Alexandra Windsor II Queen of England

Claude George Bowes-Lyon Earl of Strathmore (1855 - 1944)

father of Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon Lady

Frances Dora Smith (1832 - 1922)

mother of Claude George Bowes-Lyon Earl of Strathmore

Henrietta Mildred Hodgson (1805 - 1891)

mother of Frances Dora Smith

Robert Hodgson (1773 - 1844)

father of Henrietta Mildred Hodgson

Mildred Porteus (1744 - 1815)

mother of Robert Hodgson

Robert Porteus (1705 - 1754)

father of Mildred Porteus

Mildred Smith (1681 - 1725)

mother of Robert Porteus

Mary Warner (1664 - 1700)

mother of Mildred Smith

Mildred READE (1643 - 1686)

mother of Mary Warner

George Reade Col. Gov. (1608 - 1671)

father of Mildred READE

Mildred Windebank (1584 - 1656)

mother of George Reade Col. Gov.

Frances Marie Dymoke Lady (1550 - 1610)

mother of Mildred Windebank

Lady Anne Elizabeth Talboys (1516 - 1566)

mother of Frances Marie Dymoke Lady

Elizabeth Gascoigne (1471 - 1559)

mother of Lady Anne Elizabeth Talboys

Lady Margaret De Percy (1448 - 1486)

mother of Elizabeth Gascoigne

Sir Henry de Percy 3rd Earl of Northumberland (1421 - 1461)

father of Lady Margaret De Percy

Lady Eleanor de Neville Countess Northumerland (1417 - 1472)

mother of Sir Henry de Percy 3rd Earl of Northumberland

James Douglas I King of Scotland (1394 - 1437)

father of Lady Eleanor de Neville Countess Northumerland

Joan Stewart (1428 - 1486)

daughter of James Douglas I King of Scotland

John Gordon (1450 - 1517)

son of Joan Stewart

Isabel Gordon (1434 - 1454)

daughter of John Gordon

Thomas Macdowall (1480 - 1513)

son of Isabel Gordon

Uchtred Macdowall (1504 - 1531)

son of Thomas Macdowall

John Macdowall (1506 - 1547)

son of Uchtred Macdowall

Uchtred Macdowall (1546 - 1593)

son of John Macdowall

Thomas Macdowall (1405 - 1488)

son of Uchtred Macdowall

Uchtred MacDowall (1400 - 1513)

son of Thomas Macdowall

Thomas Macdowall (1480 - 1513)

son of Uchtred MacDowall

Uchtred Macdowall (1504 - 1531)

son of Thomas Macdowall

John MacDowall 9th Laird of Garthland (1506 - 1547)

son of Uchtred Macdowall

Uchtred Macdowall 10th Laird of Garthland (1546 - 1593)

son of John MacDowall 9th Laird of Garthland

John MacDowall (1575 - 1631)

son of Uchtred Macdowall 10th Laird of Garthland

Thomas McDowell (1628 - 1685)

son of John MacDowall

Ephraim McDowell (1673 - 1763)

son of Thomas McDowell

Mary McDowell (1713 - 1784)

daughter of Ephraim McDowell

Margaret Simonton (1740 - 1829)

daughter of Mary McDowell

William Nelson (1776 - 1814)

son of Margaret Simonton

Peter Simeon Nelson (1809 - 1892)

son of William Nelson

Peter R Nelson (1854 - 1909)

son of Peter Simeon Nelson

Harry Lester Nelson (1889 - 1970)

son of Peter R Nelson

Minnie Rozena Nelson (1906 - 1935)

daughter of Harry Lester Nelson

Elmer Glosser Jr (1929 - 2006)

son of Minnie Rozena Nelson

Eric Elmer Glosser


 King George VI of England

(1895-1952)

My 17th Cousin 7x Removed

Albert Frederick Arthur George Windsor VI King of England (1895 - 1952)

husband of 17th cousin 7x removed

Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon Lady (1900 - 2002)

wife of Albert Frederick Arthur George Windsor VI King of England

Claude George Bowes-Lyon Earl of Strathmore (1855 - 1944)

father of Elizabeth Bowes-Lyon Lady

Frances Dora Smith (1832 - 1922)

mother of Claude George Bowes-Lyon Earl of Strathmore

Henrietta Mildred Hodgson (1805 - 1891)

mother of Frances Dora Smith

Robert Hodgson (1773 - 1844)

father of Henrietta Mildred Hodgson

Mildred Porteus (1744 - 1815)

mother of Robert Hodgson

Robert Porteus (1705 - 1754)

father of Mildred Porteus

Mildred Smith (1681 - 1725)

mother of Robert Porteus

Mary Warner (1664 - 1700)

mother of Mildred Smith

Mildred READE (1643 - 1686)

mother of Mary Warner

George Reade Col. Gov. (1608 - 1671)

father of Mildred READE

Mildred Windebank (1584 - 1656)

mother of George Reade Col. Gov.

Frances Marie Dymoke Lady (1550 - 1610)

mother of Mildred Windebank

Lady Anne Elizabeth Talboys (1516 - 1566)

mother of Frances Marie Dymoke Lady

Elizabeth Gascoigne (1471 - 1559)

mother of Lady Anne Elizabeth Talboys

Lady Margaret De Percy (1448 - 1486)

mother of Elizabeth Gascoigne

Sir Henry de Percy 3rd Earl of Northumberland (1421 - 1461)

father of Lady Margaret De Percy

Lady Eleanor de Neville Countess Northumerland (1417 - 1472)

mother of Sir Henry de Percy 3rd Earl of Northumberland

James Douglas I King of Scotland (1394 - 1437)

father of Lady Eleanor de Neville Countess Northumerland

Joan Stewart (1428 - 1486)

daughter of James Douglas I King of Scotland

John Gordon (1450 - 1517)

son of Joan Stewart

Isabel Gordon (1434 - 1454)

daughter of John Gordon

Thomas Macdowall (1480 - 1513)

son of Isabel Gordon

Uchtred Macdowall (1504 - 1531)

son of Thomas Macdowall

John Macdowall (1506 - 1547)

son of Uchtred Macdowall

Uchtred Macdowall (1546 - 1593)

son of John Macdowall

Thomas Macdowall (1405 - 1488)

son of Uchtred Macdowall

Uchtred MacDowall (1400 - 1513)

son of Thomas Macdowall

Thomas Macdowall (1480 - 1513)

son of Uchtred MacDowall

Uchtred Macdowall (1504 - 1531)

son of Thomas Macdowall

John MacDowall 9th Laird of Garthland (1506 - 1547)

son of Uchtred Macdowall

Uchtred Macdowall 10th Laird of Garthland (1546 - 1593)

son of John MacDowall 9th Laird of Garthland

John MacDowall (1575 - 1631)

son of Uchtred Macdowall 10th Laird of Garthland

Thomas McDowell (1628 - 1685)

son of John MacDowall

Ephraim McDowell (1673 - 1763)

son of Thomas McDowell

Mary McDowell (1713 - 1784)

daughter of Ephraim McDowell

Margaret Simonton (1740 - 1829)

daughter of Mary McDowell

William Nelson (1776 - 1814)

son of Margaret Simonton

Peter Simeon Nelson (1809 - 1892)

son of William Nelson

Peter R Nelson (1854 - 1909)

son of Peter Simeon Nelson

Harry Lester Nelson (1889 - 1970)

son of Peter R Nelson

Minnie Rozena Nelson (1906 - 1935)

daughter of Harry Lester Nelson

Elmer Glosser Jr (1929 - 2006)

son of Minnie Rozena Nelson

Eric Elmer Glosser

     General George S. Patton

    (1885-1945)

    My 17th Cousin 7x Removed

     George Smith Patton Brig. Gen. (1885 - 1945)

    17th cousin 7x removed

    George Smith Patton Sr (1856 - 1927)

    father of George Smith Patton Brig. Gen.

    Susan Thornton Glassell (1835 - 1883)

    mother of George Smith Patton Sr

    Susan Thompson Thornton (1804 - 1836)

    mother of Susan Thornton Glassell

    William Thornton (1777 - 1818)

    father of Susan Thompson Thornton

    William Thornton (1742 - 1818)

    father of William Thornton

    Mary Frances Gregory (1720 - 1749)

    mother of William Thornton

    Mildred Warner Washington (1696 - 1747)

    mother of Mary Frances Gregory

    Mildred Warner (1671 - 1701)

    mother of Mildred Warner Washington

    Mildred READE (1643 - 1686)

    mother of Mildred Warner

    George Reade Col. Gov. (1608 - 1671)

    father of Mildred READE

    Mildred Windebank (1584 - 1656)

    mother of George Reade Col. Gov.

    Frances Marie Dymoke Lady (1550 - 1610)

    mother of Mildred Windebank

    Lady Anne Elizabeth Talboys (1516 - 1566)

    mother of Frances Marie Dymoke Lady

    Elizabeth Gascoigne (1471 - 1559)

    mother of Lady Anne Elizabeth Talboys

    Lady Margaret De Percy (1448 - 1486)

    mother of Elizabeth Gascoigne

    Sir Henry de Percy 3rd Earl of Northumberland (1421 - 1461)

    father of Lady Margaret De Percy

    Lady Eleanor de Neville Countess Northumerland (1417 - 1472)

    mother of Sir Henry de Percy 3rd Earl of Northumberland

    James Douglas I King of Scotland (1394 - 1437)

    father of Lady Eleanor de Neville Countess Northumerland

    Joan Stewart (1428 - 1486)

    daughter of James Douglas I King of Scotland

    John Gordon (1450 - 1517)

    son of Joan Stewart

    Isabel Gordon (1434 - 1454)

    daughter of John Gordon

    Thomas Macdowall (1480 - 1513)

    son of Isabel Gordon

    Uchtred Macdowall (1504 - 1531)

    son of Thomas Macdowall

    John Macdowall (1506 - 1547)

    son of Uchtred Macdowall

    Uchtred Macdowall (1546 - 1593)

    son of John Macdowall

    Thomas Macdowall (1405 - 1488)

    son of Uchtred Macdowall

    Uchtred MacDowall (1400 - 1513)

    son of Thomas Macdowall

    Thomas Macdowall (1480 - 1513)

    son of Uchtred MacDowall

    Uchtred Macdowall (1504 - 1531)

    son of Thomas Macdowall

    John MacDowall 9th Laird of Garthland (1506 - 1547)

    son of Uchtred Macdowall

    Uchtred Macdowall 10th Laird of Garthland (1546 - 1593)

    son of John MacDowall 9th Laird of Garthland

    John MacDowall (1575 - 1631)

    son of Uchtred Macdowall 10th Laird of Garthland

    Thomas McDowell (1628 - 1685)

    son of John MacDowall

    Ephraim McDowell (1673 - 1763)

    son of Thomas McDowell

    Mary McDowell (1713 - 1784)

    daughter of Ephraim McDowell

    Margaret Simonton (1740 - 1829)

    daughter of Mary McDowell

    William Nelson (1776 - 1814)

    son of Margaret Simonton

    Peter Simeon Nelson (1809 - 1892)

    son of William Nelson

    Peter R Nelson (1854 - 1909)

    son of Peter Simeon Nelson

    Harry Lester Nelson (1889 - 1970)

    son of Peter R Nelson

    Minnie Rozena Nelson (1906 - 1935)

    daughter of Harry Lester Nelson

    Elmer Glosser Jr (1929 - 2006)

    son of Minnie Rozena Nelson

    Eric Elmer Glosser

     General George Edward Pickett

    My 4th Cousin 2x Removed of Wife of 8th Great Uncle

     George Edward Pickett (1825 - 1875)

    4th cousin 2x removed of wife of 8th great-uncle

    Robert Pickett (1799 - 1856)

    father of George Edward Pickett

    George Flint Pickett Col. (1752 - 1821)

    father of Robert Pickett

    William Sanford Pickett (1700 - 1766)

    father of George Flint Pickett Col.

    George Pickett (1658 - 1740)

    father of William Sanford Pickett

    William Pickett (Piggot) (1600 - 1684)

    father of George Pickett

    William Pickett (Piggot) Capt. (1580 - 1640)

    father of William Pickett (Piggot)

    Christopher Pickett (Piggott) (1555 - 1582)

    father of William Pickett (Piggot) Capt.

    John Pickett (Piggot) (1582 - 1616)

    son of Christopher Pickett (Piggott)

    John Pickett (1605 - 1667)

    son of John Pickett (Piggot)

    John Pickett (1629 - 1667)

    son of John Pickett

    William Pickett (1665 - 1719)

    son of John Pickett

    Temperance Love Pickett (1685 - 1728)

    daughter of William Pickett

    William Lowe Jr. (1685 - 1743)

    husband of Temperance Love Pickett

    William Lowe Sr (1665 - 1725)

    father of William Lowe Jr.

    John Lowe (1687 - 1740)

    son of William Lowe Sr

    Gideon William Lowe (1719 - 1778)

    son of John Lowe

    Zadock Lowe (1748 - 1839)

    son of Gideon William Lowe

    Sarah "Sally" Lowe (1785 - 1860)

    daughter of Zadock Lowe

    William Erskine Lowe (1816 - 1885)

    son of Sarah "Sally" Lowe

    Mary "Polly" Lowe (1848 - 1882)

    daughter of William Erskine Lowe

    Luella Carpenter (1874 - 1968)

    daughter of Mary "Polly" Lowe

    Eva Sue Carper (1897 - 1973)

    daughter of Luella Carpenter

    Mary Alice Cornell (1931 - 2010)

    daughter of Eva Sue Carper

    Eric Elmer Glosser

     Abraham Lincoln

    (1809-1865)

    Uncle of Wife of 3rd Cousin 4x Removed

    16th President of the United States

     Abraham Lincoln President of the United States (1809 - 1865)

    uncle of wife of 3rd cousin 4x removed

    Thomas Lincoln (1778 - 1851)

    father of Abraham Lincoln President of the United States

    John DeHaven Lincoln (1815 - 1868)

    son of Thomas Lincoln

    Elizabeth G Lincoln (1841 - 1922)

    daughter of John DeHaven Lincoln

    Samuel Romig Hafer (1840 - 1923)

    husband of Elizabeth G Lincoln

    Amos Hafer (1814 - 1876)

    father of Samuel Romig Hafer

    Matthias Schmidt Hafer (1788 - 1857)

    father of Amos Hafer

    Matthias Hafer / Heifer / Hieber (1738 - 1791)

    father of Matthias Schmidt Hafer

    George Hafer / Heifer / Heiber (1713 - 1777)

    father of Matthias Hafer / Heifer / Hieber

    Anna Maria "Mary" Hafer / Heifer / Heiber (1755 - 1828)

    daughter of George Hafer / Heifer / Heiber

    Nicholas Glosser (1786 - 1840)

    son of Anna Maria "Mary" Hafer / Heifer / Heiber

    Henry Harrison Glosser (1824 - 1885)

    son of Nicholas Glosser

    Harrison (Henry) Llewellyn Glosser (1856 - 1939)

    son of Henry Harrison Glosser

    Harrison Glosser (1880 - 1925)

    son of Harrison (Henry) Llewellyn Glosser

    Elmer Harold Glosser (1902 - 1934)

    son of Harrison Glosser

    Elmer Glosser Jr (1929 - 2006)

    son of Elmer Harold Glosser

    Eric Elmer Glosser

     George Washington

    (1732-1799)

    1st President of the United States of America

    My 11th Cousin 13x Removed

     George Washington 1st President of the United States (1731 - 1799)

    11th cousin 13x removed

    Augustine Washington Capt (1694 - 1743)

    father of George Washington 1st President of the United States

    Mildred Warner (1671 - 1701)

    mother of Augustine Washington Capt

    Mildred READE (1643 - 1686)

    mother of Mildred Warner

    George Reade Col. Gov. (1608 - 1671)

    father of Mildred READE

    Mildred Windebank (1584 - 1656)

    mother of George Reade Col. Gov.

    Frances Marie Dymoke Lady (1550 - 1610)

    mother of Mildred Windebank

    Lady Anne Elizabeth Talboys (1516 - 1566)

    mother of Frances Marie Dymoke Lady

    Elizabeth Gascoigne (1471 - 1559)

    mother of Lady Anne Elizabeth Talboys

    Lady Margaret De Percy (1448 - 1486)

    mother of Elizabeth Gascoigne

    Sir Henry de Percy 3rd Earl of Northumberland (1421 - 1461)

    father of Lady Margaret De Percy

    Lady Eleanor de Neville Countess Northumerland (1417 - 1472)

    mother of Sir Henry de Percy 3rd Earl of Northumberland

    James Douglas I King of Scotland (1394 - 1437)

    father of Lady Eleanor de Neville Countess Northumerland

    Joan Stewart (1428 - 1486)

    daughter of James Douglas I King of Scotland

    John Gordon (1450 - 1517)

    son of Joan Stewart

    Isabel Gordon (1434 - 1454)

    daughter of John Gordon

    Thomas Macdowall (1480 - 1513)

    son of Isabel Gordon

    Uchtred Macdowall (1504 - 1531)

    son of Thomas Macdowall

    John Macdowall (1506 - 1547)

    son of Uchtred Macdowall

    Uchtred Macdowall (1546 - 1593)

    son of John Macdowall

    Thomas Macdowall (1405 - 1488)

    son of Uchtred Macdowall

    Uchtred MacDowall (1400 - 1513)

    son of Thomas Macdowall

    Thomas Macdowall (1480 - 1513)

    son of Uchtred MacDowall

    Uchtred Macdowall (1504 - 1531)

    son of Thomas Macdowall

    John MacDowall 9th Laird of Garthland (1506 - 1547)

    son of Uchtred Macdowall

    Uchtred Macdowall 10th Laird of Garthland (1546 - 1593)

    son of John MacDowall 9th Laird of Garthland

    John MacDowall (1575 - 1631)

    son of Uchtred Macdowall 10th Laird of Garthland

    Thomas McDowell (1628 - 1685)

    son of John MacDowall

    Ephraim McDowell (1673 - 1763)

    son of Thomas McDowell

    Mary McDowell (1713 - 1784)

    daughter of Ephraim McDowell

    Margaret Simonton (1740 - 1829)

    daughter of Mary McDowell

    William Nelson (1776 - 1814)

    son of Margaret Simonton

    Peter Simeon Nelson (1809 - 1892)

    son of William Nelson

    Peter R Nelson (1854 - 1909)

    son of Peter Simeon Nelson

    Harry Lester Nelson (1889 - 1970)

    son of Peter R Nelson

    Minnie Rozena Nelson (1906 - 1935)

    daughter of Harry Lester Nelson

    Elmer Glosser Jr (1929 - 2006)

    son of Minnie Rozena Nelson

    Eric Elmer Glosser